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View Full Version : Im in 9th grade English Class reading Animal Farm



Clarissa Logan
05-24-2005, 06:07 PM
Before I read this website I had no clue that the book was used as an allegory for a revoultion. I learned the true meaning behind the book.When my English teacher assigned us to read it as a class ,I was a bit shocked.When you first see or hear the book you think of it as a little children's book ( somewhere between Charlotte's web and the movie Babe)but It is much deeper and more intense than that.Currently im on the 5th chapter.We are going to take Finals on the first five chapters!

colormyworld
02-11-2006, 09:45 PM
I remember reading that last year (I'm in 10th right now). It was my favorite book that we read. Orwell is such and amazing author; I'm hoping to read 1984 when I have some more free time.

chmpman
02-11-2006, 10:03 PM
I'm surprised Animal Farm would be required reading before 1984 in a highschool curriculum. I've read both, 1984 first, and Animal Farm comes to mean so much more after understanding Orwell's view of the world as related in 1984. Also, when I did read Animal Farm my instructor took the time to discuss the symbolic meaning, and history of the fledgling Soviet Union, with the class. I found both excellent reads, and each still sticks in my memory as something I will remember for a long time to come.

Eva Marina
02-12-2006, 01:45 PM
At my high school, I don't think we read 1984 (at least not in sophomore year). But my English teacher set us up in such a way that we would read Animal Farm right before reading Huck Finn, as an introduction to satire. Obviously we had a great time reading the book, but it's going so fast because we have so many things (like Huck Finn) to take care of before our standardize test which are supposed to determine whether or not we graduate. And they've moved up the English portion by two months!
Anyway. But of the two Orwell books, I believe we are only reading Animal Farm and not 1984 at all. Although, I know quite a few people in my class (myself included) who are tackling it alone or will be.

josiehell
02-18-2006, 04:37 AM
there is a book called russia and the russina written in chronological order. if you were to read starting with the 1917 revolution and the ussr uunder communist rule, almost everything in animal farm is representing events that took place in russia at the time. old major being Lenin, napolean being Stalin, the pigs being the higher class, the borgeousie, the rest of the animals being proletariat, religion was pretty much banned in soviet union at the time, hence moses (the raven in animal farm, being exiled for preaching about a "heaven" sugarcandy mountain. there's alot more to it i wouldn't even know where to start but i really would read the book on russian history from 1900 onward, you'd definitely see the resemblance, even in things like the building of the windmill, or the battle of the cowshed. every incident in the book is a representation of events that actually happened and went on in the soviet union/ just some helpful advice. by the way, you should really read 1984 if you haven't already, also based on the ussr at the time

rory1234
02-19-2006, 06:16 AM
yea. i agree 1984 is my favourite book ever some of the ideas in the book are revelant to every day like doublethink and crimestop. it has a chapter or two that describe how although we have the technology and machinery to create a product for everyone constant war is a way of making a product that will essentially be destroyed this maskes it possibel for a prduct to reach upper class and to a lesser extent middle class people whilst not being able to rech the proleteriat(the working class) it also talks about class struggles(i could be wrong but if i am its cause im only 14) this book is a great book to read instead of doing homewrok and or in class instead of listening :P

soulsistachick
04-05-2006, 09:18 PM
I want to read 1984 but I live in New zealand and i didnt even know anything about George Orwell until about 2 months ago. I love the book especially seeing it's based on the russian revolution plz tell me something about the book 1984 i really want to know.

rabid reader
04-05-2006, 11:27 PM
I think most childerns novels are incredibly deep, (e.g. C.S Lewis Narina Collection or Gullier's Travels by Swift), mostly because in the idea of satire, you are to expose flaws in a very obsucre way. This makes these novels very entertaining for childern, but stil equally entertaining for adults.

Boris239
04-05-2006, 11:50 PM
I think most childerns novels are incredibly deep, (e.g. C.S Lewis Narina Collection or Gullier's Travels by Swift), mostly because in the idea of satire, you are to expose flaws in a very obsucre way. This makes these novels very entertaining for childern, but stil equally entertaining for adults.

Yes, some of them are, but do you really think that "1984" or "Animal farm" are children's novels?
I certainly don't agree

emily655321
04-06-2006, 06:33 PM
Yeah, "Animal Farm" was certainly never intended as a children's book. It was written as a pointed political commentary, same as "1984." It seems irresponsible of a teacher to assign the book without explaining its background and meaning with regard to the Russian revolution. We certainly spent a lot of time discussing that when I read it in high school.

They didn't assign "1984" at my school at all, before or after "Animal Farm." I agree that it would be beneficial to students to be able to discuss it in a class setting.

soulsistachick
04-06-2006, 08:23 PM
I agree Animal farm was not intended as a book for children. It has some very implicit meanings which some children that are forced to read wouldn't be able to grasp :nod:

hope_domeier
05-08-2006, 10:51 PM
we are reading animal farm in my 8th grade english class now. we are on the 9th chapter, so very excited to finish. i have never read a George Orwell book before but this book has got me interested.

superunknown
05-29-2006, 06:20 PM
I think most childerns novels are incredibly deep, (e.g. C.S Lewis Narina Collection or Gullier's Travels by Swift), mostly because in the idea of satire, you are to expose flaws in a very obsucre way. This makes these novels very entertaining for childern, but stil equally entertaining for adults.
Gulliver's Travels is not a children's book. It only gives that appearance because that accentuates the satire even more and makes it much more vicious, sort of like with Candide.

GeeItsChelsea
08-20-2006, 08:49 AM
I totally agree with you! I had no clue how politically shocking this book's underlying meaning was during the time it was written!:thumbs_up

RobinHood3000
08-20-2006, 09:38 AM
I felt much the same way about The Chronicles of Narnia.

bookworm937
09-20-2006, 04:46 AM
I'm in 9th grade, and I read Animal Farm just recently for English - in fact, I'm supposed to be working on my essay on it this very minute. :blush: I finished it way before anyone else in my class, and I was very intrigued. For a different class, I had to review some books that I thought every teen should read (long story, don't ask). I included 1984, and I read it about two weeks ago. It was really good, but I found it sort of depressing, and the part at the end was really scary. One review I saw said it all: "Everyone should read this book, but many will wish they hadn't."

Jazzy_zZz
10-20-2006, 08:35 PM
I'ts a coincidence that I am in the 12th grade and we only had one of many books to choses from and one of them was 1984, because it's only a second language class it's optional to read 2 books of ur choice and one in class that will be studies by the class. But there is nobody forcing someone not to read the book at any time if they wish not to take the class but only to read the book. The first 100 pages was jam-packed of information. From page 200 it became very intersesting with the aknowledgement of the prescence of Julia. but from when the kidnapping starts it's very detailed of the torture he precedes.. And the ending was quite akward was the alcohol blurring they're vision, so everybody won't doublethink? Still somethings are still misunderstood from my end, but I enjoyed the details, the vast category of scenes ( especially the forest, ruins of a church, mr. Charrington's shop,etc.)
The thinking of questionning if the reality was reality (Big Brother, wars over the 3 super-powered country : eastasia, oceana,eurasia).

cuppajoe_9
10-20-2006, 08:44 PM
I can't believe an english teacher would have their class read Animal Farm without mentioning the Russian Revolutions. It's like reading The Catcher in the Rye without talking about loss of childhood innocence.