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Carmilla
06-03-2015, 11:54 AM
Hello everyone!

I'm reading Romola, and am enjoying it very much. But, I have a problem :), I HATE Tito Melema. He seems to me to be so despicable. What he does to Baldasarre is horrible. And all his lies, etc. What do you think of Tito? Please don't tell me how the book ends, I haven't finished it yet. :)

Pompey Bum
06-03-2015, 11:57 AM
Hi Carmilla. I haven't read that one, so I'm useless to you this time. Always nice to see you in these parts, though. :seeya:

Carmilla
06-03-2015, 12:05 PM
Nice to see you too!! :)

Pompey Bum
06-03-2015, 12:39 PM
Sorry I can't help. How did your work with Measure for Measure go?

Carmilla
06-04-2015, 10:32 AM
Hi Pompey!!

I found 'Measure for Measure' extremely interesting. I particularly liked the way in which it leaves the end with things not solved. For instance, will Isabella marry the Duke or not? I think she won't because she'll prefer a religious life for herself. What do you think?

Pompey Bum
06-04-2015, 10:52 AM
Isabella's silence is enigmatic, and Shakespeare probably meant it to be so. Personally I think that Isabella has had enough of the tricks of the secular world and wants only to return to her cloister; but I suppose her silence could also be taken as a tacit submission to Angelo's wishes. That doesn't sound like the Isabella whose virginity was worth more to her than her brother's life, though, so like you, I favor the former resolution.

Jackson Richardson
06-05-2015, 07:46 AM
Hello carmilla

Romola as a historical novel is George Eliot’s least typical novel. I have read it but I don’t remember much about it. I’m sure it was written with her characteristic intelligence and breadth of human sympathy. I find her prose style a bit clunky and if you are reading her in the original, I’m awestruck and your enthusiasm and ability.

George Eliot hardly ever described totally unsympathetic characters – there’s usually a degree of sympathy even. The two exceptions are Rosalind Vincy in Middlemarch (and even there we can see how she got as she is) and Grandcourt in Daniel Deronda. Maybe writing about a period and society she didn’t know at first hand, she allowed herself to create a villain in Romola.

Carmilla
06-05-2015, 10:56 AM
Isabella's silence is enigmatic, and Shakespeare probably meant it to be so. Personally I think that Isabella has had enough of the tricks of the secular world and wants only to return to her cloister; but I suppose her silence could also be taken as a tacit submission to Angelo's wishes. That doesn't sound like the Isabella whose virginity was worth more to her than her brother's life, though, so like you, I favor the former resolution.

We agree. :)

Carmilla
06-05-2015, 11:02 AM
Hello JonathanB!!


Hello carmilla

Romola as a historical novel is George Eliot’s least typical novel. I have read it but I don’t remember much about it. I’m sure it was written with her characteristic intelligence and breadth of human sympathy. I find her prose style a bit clunky and if you are reading her in the original, I’m awestruck and your enthusiasm and ability.

Yes, I'm reading her in English. :) And, as you said, I find it her least typical novel.


George Eliot hardly ever described totally unsympathetic characters – there’s usually a degree of sympathy even. The two exceptions are Rosalind Vincy in Middlemarch (and even there we can see how she got as she is) and Grandcourt in Daniel Deronda. Maybe writing about a period and society she didn’t know at first hand, she allowed herself to create a villain in Romola.

I haven't read Daniel Deronda yet. But I agree with you that Rosalind Vincy was somewhat unsympathetic.

Glad to see you again. ;-)

Carmilla
07-29-2015, 10:08 AM
Hello everyone!

If you haven't read Romoladon't read this post because I give a very important part of the plot away.

Yesterday I finished reading Romola, and I have to tell you that I'm glad that Tito Melema was murdered by Baldasarre. I think he deserved no other end, he was too vile.

I liked Romola very much, though not so much as other books by George Eliot.