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mikecox
07-27-2012, 05:10 PM
Re: III.1, 82-3

I understand that there is a relationship between "Vice" and "Iniquity"; and that they have "two meaning", but I also understand that they both represent the "7 deadly sins"; which is 7 meanings!

I can't figure out what all that has to do the gist of his conversation with the prince, or his statement in line 81: without characters (written records) fame lives long".

mikecox
07-28-2012, 12:22 PM
Just trying to get this back to the top

Charles Darnay
07-28-2012, 12:46 PM
line numbers in Shakespeare are not consistent across the editions and I don't feel like combing the scene. Can you post the lines in question?

mikecox
07-28-2012, 02:32 PM
line numbers in Shakespeare are not consistent across the editions I have two references and, while the line numbers don't line up exactly, they are close enough.

But they aren't really relevant in this case. :argue:


Can you post the lines in question?

This point, made by Richard in act 3, is a pretty well know; not sure why you would need the quote; :rant:


This, like the formal Vice, Iniquity, I moralize two meaning in one word.

Lancaster red
04-05-2013, 08:31 PM
Re: III.1, 82-3

I understand that there is a relationship between "Vice" and "Iniquity"; and that they have "two meaning", but I also understand that they both represent the "7 deadly sins"; which is 7 meanings!

I can't figure out what all that has to do the gist of his conversation with the prince, or his statement in line 81: without characters (written records) fame lives long".

The Yale Shakespeare edition of Richard III has an excellent note of explanation for these lines:

III. i. 82. the formal Vice, Iniquity. A reference to the old morality plays in which the Vice (comic demon) was sometimes called Iniquity. Richard says that he will speak equivocally, like the Vice of the old play, and thus to one word give a double meaning. Fame may live long, but one person of whom he is thinking will not.