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Laszlo Jamf
10-21-2011, 04:32 AM
I recently picked up his collected works from a local bookstore and was wondering where to start or rather where to go. I've read Don Juan, Childe Harold's Pilgrimage and Beppo. I was wondering what are his best works apart from these ones? Also what does everyone else think of Byron? Sorry in advance if this thread has been made before/this was the wrong place to put the thread.

Dreamwoven
09-28-2013, 08:36 AM
Try The Prisoner of Chillon, my favourite. Or The Battle 0f Lepanto.

There is a good blog on Byron: worth visiting and even following: theworldoflordbyron

Dreamwoven
09-28-2013, 10:17 AM
I recently picked up his collected works from a local bookstore and was wondering where to start or rather where to go. I've read Don Juan, Childe Harold's Pilgrimage and Beppo. I was wondering what are his best works apart from these ones? Also what does everyone else think of Byron? Sorry in advance if this thread has been made before/this was the wrong place to put the thread.

I meant also to say that Childe Harold's Pilgrimage has a quote concerning the founder of Sweden's Bernadotte Dynasty in the 3rd canto:
LVI
By Coblentz, on a rise of gentle ground,
***There is a small and simple pyramid,
***Crowning the summit of the verdant mound;
***Beneath its base are heroes’ ashes hid,
***Our enemy’s, - but let not that forbid
***Honour to Marceau! o’er whose early tomb
***Tears, big tears, gushed from the rough soldier’s lid,
***Lamenting and yet envying such a doom,
Falling for France, whose rights he battled to resume.

Dreamwoven
04-26-2014, 11:39 AM
My all-timer favourite is The Prisoner of Chillon. Many years ago I learned parts of it by heart, from a copy I made of the poem. It is about a prisoner called François Bonivard, a Genevois Monk, imprisoned in the dungeon of Chateau Chillon on Lake Geneva. See the summary here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Prisoner_of_Chillon).

Dreamwoven
05-03-2014, 09:41 AM
I found this website, has most of the works of Byron but not all. I can't find The Prisoner of of Chillon in it anywhere.

Others might find it helpful, though.

http://www.robertburns.org/works/

Dreamwoven
08-11-2016, 04:31 AM
The bridge Byron used to ride over was The Brig o Balgownie (http://www.visitabdn.com/attractions-and-activities/view/brig-o-balgownie), at the time the lowest crossing over the River Don before the sea (now the lowest is the modern Bridge of Don).

Balgownie is mediaeval, built in the late-1200s and early-1300s (http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/brig-o-balgownie), and with narrow with passing place for pack animals. I had friends who lived near there, and knew it well in the late 1960s.

Old Aberdeen (https://www.abdn.ac.uk/events/documents/old_aberdeen_trail.pdf) is the old town, largely preserved and including King's College (http://www.abdn.ac.uk/chaplaincy/chapel/).

“As 'Auld Lang Syne' brings Scotland, one and all,
Scotch plaids,Scotch snoods, the blue hills, and clear streams,
The Dee, the Don, Balgounie's brig's black wall,
All my boy feelings, all my gentler dreams
Of what I then dreamt, clothed in their own pall,
Like Banquo's offspring; - floating past me seems
My childhood in this childishness of mine:
I care not - 'tis a glimpse of 'Auld Lang Syne.'”
Don Juan Lord Byron 1788-1824

Jackson Richardson
08-11-2016, 06:32 AM
I found this website, has most of the works of Byron but not all. I can't find The Prisoner of of Chillon in it anywhere.

Others might find it helpful, though.

http://www.robertburns.org/works/

You can't find The Prisoner of Chillon because that was written by Lord Byron and the website gives the works of Robert Burns, who was a totally different person. I don't want to sound rude, but you are muddling them up.

Jackson Richardson
08-11-2016, 06:36 AM
I found the text of The Prisoner of Chillon here:

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems-and-poets/poems/detail/43842

or here:

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems-and-poets/poems/detail/43842

Dreamwoven
08-11-2016, 10:54 AM
Yes, I must have muddled them up, Jackson. Thanks for pointing out my error. My main point is that Lord Byron did write the Prisoner of Chillon.

Pompey Bum
08-11-2016, 11:09 AM
Don't worry about it, DW. Everyone makes mistakes, and yours was made in kindly trying to help another person. I have long admired your kindness and helpfulness on this site. Perhaps this is a good time to mention it. :)

Jackson Richardson
08-11-2016, 11:09 AM
There are a couple of links on the Byron 'Society webpage for selected poems, including The Prisoner of Chillon here.

http://www.thebyronsociety.com/byron-links

As they say, enjoy. (I hope I didn't upset DW by my comment. I was glad to see Pompey's reassurance.)

I find something odd about Byron in that with other poets I can recognise their voice, their distinct style, even writing in the same metre. Apart from Don Juan I can't get that with Byron.

That may account for him being very popular with non-English speakers reading him in translation - it is the subject matter rather than the poetry which fascinates.

Dreamwoven
08-12-2016, 12:17 AM
Don't worry about it, DW. Everyone makes mistakes, and yours was made in kindly trying to help another person. I have long admired your kindness and helpfulness on this site. Perhaps this is a good time to mention it. :)

Thank you for your kind words, Pompey!

Dreamwoven
08-12-2016, 12:22 AM
There are a couple of links on the Byron 'Society webpage for selected poems, including The Prisoner of Chillon here.

http://www.thebyronsociety.com/byron-links

As they say, enjoy. (I hope I didn't upset DW by my comment. I was glad to see Pompey's reassurance.)

I find something odd about Byron in that with other poets I can recognise their voice, their distinct style, even writing in the same metre. Apart from Don Juan I can't get that with Byron.

That may account for him being very popular with non-English speakers reading him in translation - it is the subject matter rather than the poetry which fascinates.
That's probably true, Jackson. I'm actually glad to receive corrections like yours, its all about the spirit corrections are given in.

You may be right about Byron, even though his English is Scots.

Jackson Richardson
08-13-2016, 04:34 AM
You may be right about Byron, even though his English is Scots.

Burns wrote in Scots in his best known and loved poems. Byron wrote in literary English, although Don Juan plays with (aristocratic) vernacular.

I'm not a great one for either poet to be honest, but that's just me.

Dreamwoven
08-13-2016, 04:56 AM
I agree with you, Jackson. The Prisoner of Chillon had a special appeal to me, but I don't have any other Byron work that I particularly like.

Jackson Richardson
08-13-2016, 04:10 PM
I hadn’t thought what Burns and Byron had in common until now.

They almost have the same name.

They were both very, very good looking.

They both died early.

Their lives overlapped.

Their poetry was immensely popular and widely read although they were both writing in opposition to conventional expectations.

But the differences are much greater, Burn Scottish and Byron English, Burns pretty well working class and educated locally, Byron aristocratic (he inherited the title as a child from an uncle -his father was already dead) and educated at an elite school (Harrow – the same as Winston Churchill and Tennyson.)

Byron's mother was Scottish and he spent time in Scotland as a child, but not the Ayrshire Lowlands where Burns lived.

Dreamwoven
08-14-2016, 05:15 AM
I've learned something new here, thanks, Jackson.