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Logos
05-30-2011, 04:24 AM
As some of you might already know... for every e-text book on LitNet there's the option to submit your own introduction to it for possible inclusion on that book's introduction page. For example

http://www.online-literature.com/henry_james/turn_screw/

I recently received a bunch of summaries for James's novel, might have been a class assignment or something, but, as they can't all fit on one page I'm going to post them here. If one of these is yours? you can join the site and discuss further if you wish :)

Logos
05-30-2011, 04:25 AM
In the beginning, all is innocent. In "The Turn of the Screw," the 1898 classic of mystery and horror by Henry James, all is rebirthed to life in a tale around the fire on a wintry Christmas Eve. The reader speaks, and the evident Victorian setting of is painted: the lovely, expansive Bly manor set next to a peaceful woods and lake, horse-drawn carriages for the wealthy, a pervasive class structure that allows children to have higher ranks than adults, and governesses that take care of wealthy children. Where peace in the quiet Bly estate initially consumes all, ghosts only the governess can see are beginning to prowl. She stands resolutely, determined to protect her orphaned charges, Miles and Flora, at all cost. At first, she is successful with her quest; but, when questions abound concerning the true faces of the children and ghosts only she can see, will all the shadows be chased away? Or will the ghosts prevail, spreading the darkness of death to the only living residents of Bly?--Submitted by Natalie

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On the cusp of Christmas morning, friends gathered around a fire to narrate frightening ghost stories. One of the gentlemen tells a story of a young governess who comes to stay at a country home and watch over the children. However, after her introduction to the new home, the governess begins to believe that things are not what they seem. She comes across two ghosts that only she can see, children who are oddly indirect when questioned, and the master, who refused to be bothered by them, is nowhere to be found. Henry James captures the true mystery in the psychological aspect of questioning one’s own sanity. After more than a century, the Turn of the Screw is still able to keep the reader fully involved and eager to turn the page.--Submitted by Tom Hushen

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Sometimes the unseen line between reality and fiction are blurred. This mesh between realities allows Henry James’ Turn of the Screw, to portray the stream of consciousness of a distraught governess during the Victorian period. As a governess, she is expected to uphold the name of the family that she works for, but when she meets the heavenly niece and nephew of her elusive employer, she begins to feel as if something is not quite right at Bly estate. When she notices the children acting different and discovers the secrets of Bly, she realizes that these supernatural events could mean the possibility of losing the children to her ghostly predecessor. Can she save their souls or could it all be just a sign of her fading sanity?--Submitted by Jacqueline Zavala

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Christmas is a time for anticipation; the cool air is filled with excitement of the dreams of the young and old, dreams of gatherings with family and the sharing of stories: some good, some bad and some even supernatural. In The Turn of the Screw, a story is told on Christmas Eve about a new governess at an estate called Bly. Although the children seem lively and clever, there is something unusual happening to them. Does it have something to do with the past love affair of the dead owner and dead governess? Could they just be innocent children with curious minds or could it be ghosts of the past haunting the children and trying to take advantage of them? As the story progresses, one cannot help but question if these events are actual supernatural occurrences that only the governess seems to witness or is it all just a psychological game?--Submitted by Lyra

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The Turn of the Screw begins with the telling of a ghost story on Christmas Eve that sets the tone of the novel. A young governess begins her stay in Bly, and begins to suspect the two children living there are haunted by the ghost of the previous governess and her lover. Acting as the narrator, the governess tells her story in James’ vividly impressive Victorian diction, adding to the suspense and confusion of the reader. Are the children simply innocent victims, or are they cooperating with these frightening apparitions? Is the narrator insane and just imagining these events, or is she being truthful and really seeing these horrors before her very eyes? The novel is vague enough to keep the reader wondering, but descriptive enough to satisfy the imagination.--Submitted by Cat

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This tale begins with a woman sharing her ghost story of supernatural events, sexual and spiritual opacity, with a group of friends around a fire, on Christmas Eve. With the story taking place at a Bly, a country house, with a governess, Mrs. Grose, two children, and a ghost haunting the house. With only the governess being able to see the ghost in plain sight and the children thinking she is mad leaves the writer, Henry James, only to keep his readers thinking of what will happen next. The governess suspicion of the last governess and her lover are possessing the children, which leads her to suspect an evil doing coming in play. Everyone thinks she’s crazy, no one believes her; she doesn’t know what to do. With trying to question the children, they get misleading and hard to get anything from the children, especially with the uncle (master of the house) gone. Are the children making up stories, or is the governess going mad and delusional? With no questions answered, The Turn of the Screw gives twisted events, and Goss pump chills down the spines of the readers.--Submitted by Samantha Torres

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On a late Christmas eve, guests shared common ghosts stories, but one stood more peculiar than the rest. The story is told of a governess involved with two children, miles and flora. Miles, believed to be a gentleman, has been recently kicked out of school without any explanation. As the governess strolls around the grounds of bly, she encounters a stare from a man in the window of a tower. She tells Mrs. Grose of the encounter, and she finds the shocking news that the man she encounters is believed to be dead! another female apparition is also spotted. Not only have the supernatural sightings have been felt by the governess, but she is convinced that these ghosts are making communication with the children. Many questions and missing pieces are needed to be filled, and the governess needs to find out before injury, or even death is the end result.--Submitted by Silence Dogood

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Friends anxiously awaited the usual spine-chilling tales sitting around the crackling wood of the flames on that cold winter’s night. While sitting in the old house, Douglas, a boy who is present at the fire, volunteers to tell the tale of a governess, her pupils, and two ghosts. The two phantoms in the whole picture appear Peter Quint and Miss. Jessel, both of whom have previously worked with the offspring. This story of psychological terror quickly unravels as the governess tries to combat the evil spirits from her students but is fundamentally unsuccessful with “saving” the children. When the governess distinctly points out the ghosts to any other person, they’re concealed with the ghosts. Are the children really being controlled and manipulated by the haunted apparitions or is the governess presently insane? Is the governess powerless compared to the supernatural beings present or is she fighting a subliminal battle with herself?--Submitted by Kassandra Tamez

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Logos
05-30-2011, 04:25 AM
It was an eerie Christmas Eve, and the night was filled with ghost stories shared amongst a group of friends, including one of a an apparition seen as a little boy. It wasn't until later that evening that Douglas reveals a manuscript written by a woman, that died twenty years ago. His sister's governess. The manuscript describes a haunting of two children within the country-house they reside in on the Bly estate. She then goes on to narrate the tale that soon becomes a chill to read. The governess arrives at Bly and is very impressed with the house. She then meets the housekeeper Mrs. Grose and a young eight year-old named Flora. It wasn't until days later that Miles arrives and is swiftly followed by a letter from school stating that he is dismissed for his behavior.One rainy Sunday morning, the governess is preparing to go to church and in the midst of rushing she sees a man watching her from outside the dining room window. In a quick reaction she runs out to find him, but no one is there.Who could this man be?Could the haunting really be the nephew and niece of the handsome gentleman who left them as her responsibility? How is it that she’s the only one that can see these apparitions? Could this governess just be mad?The governess confesses that she might have been 'carried away' when agreeing to taking this post.--Submitted by Kristyn Morin

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Round the warm fire on a cold Christmas Eve, friends gathered to share ghost stories. One guest in particular begins to tell about a Governess and her encounters with the supernatural. Henry James author of The Turn of The Screw begins his novelette with precise and vibrant detail told through eyes of the Governess. As the story progresses, it turns from a lovely stay at Bly into a dark and physiological experience for the Governess that quickly fades into a blur. The Governess is encountered by two ghosts only whom she could see. With two orphaned children vulnerable to love, the Governess believes that the deceased governesses and her dead lover have gained control of the poor children for some demonic purpose. Has she gone mad or is there something more to Bly? No one knows what she is talking about and the children seem to be deceptive to perfectly visible apparitions standing right in front of them. With unanswered questions, The Turn of The Screw creates a mind blowing experience for captivated readers.--Submitted by H.E.B. Girl

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It is a story within a novel, a journey that unfolds as the audience is listening to it, and facts too deceitful to believe. On Christmas Eve behind the dark depths of Bly, an old house in America, there is a story never told before full of supernatural experiences. It seems as though the governess of this story is haunted by the secrets that surround the home she is working at. As time progresses she finds herself tormented by the past that seems not to let go of anyone, especially Flora and Miles, the children she is looking after. Filled with ghosts, secrets, and motives yet to be discovered this Christmas story is the driving force towards the madness that encircles the governess... or perhaps only a figment of her imagination.--Submitted by Geneva Padron

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On Christmas eve, there is a gathering around the fire while they tell the story of a young governess who goes to a manor named Bly. As her work begins, an adventure of the underworld unravels before her eyes. She begins to feel the urge to find out what has happened in the past with her two pupils, Flora and Miles. While ten-year-old Miles has been kicked out of school, he returns back to Bly and makes things interesting for the governess. Miles becomes almost bizarre in the governess's eyes, for she tries to find out why Miles was suspended from school. As she tries to unravel the mystery of the children, there's still the ghost of Quint, an old friend of the owner of the mansion, who keeps showing up on the top floor. This intrigues the governess and she tries to find out what is his purpose. With the mystery of the house, the ghost, and the children, The Turn of the Screw, will keep you reading until the mystery is unraveled.--Submitted by brenda Noemi

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The Turn of the Screw. The story starts out on Christmas Eve, with a group of the people that have a craving to hear a ghost story. The speaker of the story sets the story at Bly, a large old house with towers and abandoned rooms. He starts his story talking about a governess who is brought to Bly to care for two abandoned children, while the owner is away. The governess claimed to see ghosts, Miss Jessel, the last governess and Mr. Quint, her lover, that came back to do evil to the children. The governess thinks that the children are being controlled by these two ghosts. When the Flora and Miles are confronted about unusual events that happen, they seem to avoid the subject. Some might think that she is paranoid for thinking this way, but as the author put it, the ghost’s seemed to have had some type of sexual encounters with the children. Henry James also tries to psychologically tempt the reader to think that the governess is suffering from paranoia because the fact that she only sees the ghosts and no one else does. Who dies? If someone is to die, who would it be? To know the real story behind this unsolved mystery one will have to read carefully and analyze every character and their actions.--Submitted by Daniel Ray Tapia

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On one Christmas evening stories were being told, and a man named Douglas recalled a very frightening tale. The story consisted of a governess, two children,Flora and Miles, and Mrs.Grose, a servant and companion of the governess. One night while strolling around the home the governess encounters a man staring at her from a window in the tower. Later, she sees the man again in the window of the dining room. The Governess tells Mrs.Grose only to hear the shocking news that the man she encounters is believed to be already dead! She believes he is after Miles. Then, one day at a lake with Flora, the governess sees a woman dressed in all black. She senses it is Miss Jessel, her dead predecessor. The governess thinks both of these children are being followed by these apparitions. How and why are these ghosts trying to reach out to the children? What do they seek from them? Strange things begin to happen nightly on the grounds, and the governess must find the answers to this mystery before someone is seriously injured, or even killed again.--Submitted by M bone

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“The Turn of the Screw” begins on Christmas Eve with a family sitting telling ghost stories. A governess arrives at the new home and is introduced to young Flora and the house keeper named Mrs. Grose.The governess is informed about Miles, the older brother of Flora; he is to be picked up from school because he was expelled. Once Miles and Flora are confortable with the governess, strange sightings begin to appear to the unseen eye. The governess begins to see apparitions of ghostly figures, one of a man and then of a female. After several appearances the governess begins to see a sudden behavioral change in the children which alarms both the governess and Mrs. Gorse, the governess believes Miles and Flora have a part in the appearances of the two ghosts. Mrs. Grose figures out the ghost are the spirits of the former governess Miss Jessel and a man by the name of Peter Quint. The behavior of the children gets out of hand and things turn for the worst.--Submitted by T. Swift

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This story is much more than just a breathtaking horror story. Henry James incorporates the tragedy of two young lovers, the ideals of society, the struggle between good and evil, and the uncertainty of possible psychological issues to what otherwise would just be a simple ghost story. It begins in an eerie Christmas Eve as a group of friends gather around a fire to share ghost stories. One of the guests, Douglas, then decides to share with them a manuscript written by a governess. The story immediately shifts to the point of view of the governess, who narrates the events that took place while she was caring for two orphaned children. The story becomes increasingly suspenseful as the governess struggles to save the souls of the children from the ghosts of the former governess and the valet. Yet she is the only one who sees these ghosts. Could it have been the hallucinations of a mad governess or were there really ghosts in the house? What secrets were the children hiding from her? Were the children being controlled by the ghosts?--Submitted by Anonymous

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A ghost story turns into a psychological thriller when the tale of a new governess’s time spent in Bly deepens. During her first few days at Bly, she sees apparitions which seem to be after her two young charges, Flora and Miles. The governess wonders how she can save the children when they refuse to share about their lives. As months pass, the children start to act peculiar when asked about the apparitions. As the governess tries frantically to save the children, the apparitions start to appear more often. With only one person in the house believing her, the governess tries to desperately prove the existence of the apparitions and to save her charges from the evil trying to capture them. How can the governess find solid prove about the apparitions evil intensions? What kind of secrets are the children keeping from her?--Submitted by Daisy Berlanga

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This novel portrays what the characters seem to perceive, which include supernatural appearances as well as psychological thoughts, emotions, and beliefs. The setting is at a spooky, old, big house named Bly, with a group of people sharing ghost stories on Christmas Eve. One brings up a story about a governess who is sent to care for two children, and the problems she encounters along with the little boy named Miles and a little girl named Flora. The governess is convinced that supernatural visitors, have something to do with the way in which the children act which involve a Mr. Quint and a Miss Jessel. Yet the governess cannot get enough evidence to convince others about the apparitions, which make the reader, wonder what the governess is experiencing. The governess is very convinced in getting to bottom of this. She tries to get some insight from both Miles and Flora, but they do not cooperate much. Are governess’s encounters actually real? Is it that she is suffering from paranoia? Or are her clues steadily bringing the ones responsible for Miles and Flora’s behavior to the scene?--Submitted by Anonymous

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Ghost stories told around a fire, on the eve of Christmas, results in a guest telling a supernatural story about a governess and her pupils. Henry James sends the reader on a worthwhile ride of psychological twists and turns in this England set novel. The governess tries to save her two pupils, Miles and Flora, from the evil spirits of the former governess and her lover. While the master of the house, the children’s uncle, does not want to be bothered the governess is left to fend for herself, as all other household staff refuse to admit the seeing of these ghosts. This haunted tale continues as the questions of the governess’s sanity and whether these children can be saved arise. Readers are kept at the edge of their seats as the mystery between the living and the dead is revealed.--Submitted by Rebecca Lee Salazar

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The ghostly story of The Turn of the Screw starts with a group of relatives and friends exchanging local ghost stories. A conflict as to the true story behind a haunting in Bly sparks commotion and rumors to the reality of the situation that happened at the estate. After being abandoned by their uncle, the children of Bly send the governess and Mrs. Grose in a whirl of turmoil as the task of caretaking becomes more difficult. The visible evidence investigated by the young governess between the ghosts with Miles and Flora give an opposing sense of peace and suspicion behind the mysterious encounters. The only thing in the way of the governess discovering the possessiveness of the spirits though lies in the children, and they are not talking. Why are the children so stern about revealing information about the ghosts? Will the haunting bring more than a quick scare?--Submitted by Matthew Galvan

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Logos
06-03-2011, 03:13 AM
The warmth of the fire keeps a group of younger eager individuals warm as a story sends chills down their spine. The tale of a young governess arrival in a new estate is centered on her encounter with evil manifestations. Two young children of the house are left under the governess care, which slightly distracts from the secrets of the nights. The governess enthusiasm quickly turns into obsession as she tries to discover the truth behind Bly, the estate. Henry James captures the reader’s attention with the mystery of the supernatural and questions the sanity of the young governess.--Submitted by E.R.A.

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As the governess arrives at Bly she tries to figure why the children, Miles and Flora, are acting so oddly, but they seem to always be one step ahead in keeping her in the dark. However, not only that, she has to protect them from the evil that she feels lurking around the estate. What unknown supernatural being could be sneaking around their home? Is it the estate that needs to be abandoned or is the haunting being done directly to them? She has set her mind in solving the mystery. Is there even a mystery to solve? Could it all be in her head? Nevertheless, there is definitely something going on at Bly.--Submitted by Anonymous.

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Possesed children, ghostly figures, and tormented minds litter Henry James's Turn of the Screw. The young new Governess of the house Bly has come into a living house of horrors where the worst part isnt the ghosts, but the fact that she is the only one who can see them. Although she is not alone in the house, in her mind she is completely isoolated. The children and the housekeeper Mrs. Grose know something and won't tell her and this torments her more. The ghosts of passed servants Mr. Quint and Miss Jessel torment her qnd steal the children day after day and the governess has no power to save them although she tries hard to do so. The mind is a powerful tool of self-destruction, and once it has been set in motion, there is no stopping.--Submitted by Anthony Moreno.

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On a Christmas Eve night the story begins in the novelThe Turn Of The Screw. Ghost stories are being shared around the fire by the guests in the household. The Governess, a new worker arrives at her new work place which is under the same roof as Miles and Flora, the two children she will be taking care of. Very soon, the governess sees two ghosts, ghosts that only she, the children, and Mrs. Grose are capable of seeing. She believes the children are the reason for the ghosts. She goes on in search to find an explanation for why all of this is happening. Does she find an explanation? Are the children really the reason for all this chaos?--Submitted by Anonymous.

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On a Christmas Eve around a fireplace a story of ghosts is being told. The story is about a woman who becomes a governess and travels to mysterious Bly. Upon the dramatic encounter with a spirit while wondering through a tower of Bly, her obsession with learning their nature begins. She speaks to the children, Flora and Miles, but apparently, they know nothing about any ghosts. The governess believes she sees the ghosts, and starts questioning their actions towards the well-being of the children. Seeming frightened of the possible intentions of the ghosts, and in urgent need of fulfilling her duty, she attempts to shield her pupils. After the disappointing scenes, the reader begins to inquire whether or not the governess is lying about the ghosts’ presence.--Submitted by Josue Edden Vargas.

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On a Merry Christmas eve like any other- friends and family gather around an open flame- to hear a story of possession in the English country side. A young governess is pursued by mysterious apparitions whose shadowed intentions threaten the wellbeing of the estate’s inhabitants. This discerning tale of the psychoanalytical labyrinth of the human mind will thrill you at each turn of the page. When no one else can see the desperate evils that lurk behind every corner what is left to validate her sanity? The young governess must discover for herself if her suspicions of treachery can be justified. Are her pupils acting in deception or is she simply spiraling uncontrollably into insanity? Within the margins of this novella, Henry James’ classic Turn of the Screw, continues to construct a flawless account of bone-shilling apprehension.--Submitted by Anonymous.

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The Turns of the Screw is a story of a young governess whose job is to take care of two kids named Miles and Flora, whose uncle she is secretly infatuated with. Her story is being unraveled by a group of friend telling ghost stories around a warm fire. As the governess story is being told, she is haunted by two supernatural entities, which are trying to, in her perspective, “destroy” her two young pupils she is caring for. As the governess professes her encounters with the unwanted visitors, others don’t see, to believe her much and find her a bit mad. The story of the governess has many “twist and turns” as she tries to get to the reason of the apparitions and to maintain a protection barrier over both Miles and Flora.--Submitted by Ashlee Kristine Garcia.

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One Christmas a family was sitting right by a fire side to hear a tale of how a Governess was plagued with ghostly encounters. Trying to protect the family from the supernatural visitors the new Governess knows that the ghosts that have been haunting the Bly country house are the old governess and Peter Quint. Being the only one who can see the ghosts how can she protect the children and her sanity? The Children Miles and Flora will not talk about the ghosts, and when asked questions are extremely evasive. Were the children scared when asked questions about the ghost, or was the Governess being overly paranoid? Every turn of the page is a mind twist with so many unanswered questions that only the “Turn of the Screw” can offer to every reader who reads every page beyond the title of this book.--Submitted by Richard chavez.

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One Christmas a family was sitting right by a fire side to hear a tale of how a Governess was plagued with ghostly encounters. Trying to protect the family from the supernatural visitors the new Governess knows that the ghosts that have been haunting the Bly country house are the old governess and Peter Quint. Being the only one who can see the ghosts how can she protect the children and her sanity? The Children Miles and Flora will not talk about the ghosts, and when asked questions are extremely evasive. Were the children scared when asked questions about the ghost, or was the Governess being overly paranoid? Every turn of the page is a mind twist with so many unanswered questions that only the “Turn of the Screw” can offer to every reader who reads every page beyond the title of this book.--Submitted by Richard chavez.

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As the story "The Turn of the Screw," unfolds in vivid detail around a campfire, an audience learns of the uncanny events that take place in a mansion. In this mansion reside two children by the names of Miles and Flora, who are under the care of the governess and Mrs. Grose. Throughout the duration of their stay, eerie and unfortunate affairs take place and nearly the best of them. While the logic of the governess is not so far-fetched, she is able to guide us into a world unknown to many humans, but familiar to those who have experienced the supernatural. Underlying all these eerie moments is also a hint of infatuation and the roles of younglings and adulthood. As the mind of younglings is so fragile in comparison to those who are elder, it is where the story is born and the seed of eternal evil is planted.--Submitted by Jonathan Ray Garcia.

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It is the night of Christmas Eve and a group of friends, before departing for bed, is gathered around to listen to what, at first, appears to be just a ghost story. However, the tale quickly evolves to be much more. The governess is struggling to maintain herself as she is being haunted by a terrible evil that she is trying to protect the children, an orphaned boy and an orphaned girl who are brother and sister, from by solely offering herself as the one to experience all of the horror. Ultimately, she fails as the spirits take over both the boy and girl and are controlling them. On the other hand, it also appears that the governess herself is going mad as she is the only one who can notice the ghosts when they are around. Is the governess fighting against two wicked spirits to recover her pupils? Or is she battling against a more unexpected kind of evil: her own mind? Henry James leaves it for the readers to decide for themselves in his cleverly constructed tale of horror and suspense.--Submitted by Anonymous.

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During one Christmas Eve, a young man reveals the untold story to a group of eager listeners of a young governess who begins a new, wonderful life at Bly, an old, secluded country house where she will care for two very charming children, Flora and Miles, with the help of the housekeeper, Mrs. Grose. However, her future in Bly begins to look grim as events begin to occur that will bring up questions to challenge the relationships between every person in the house. Why was Miles expelled from school? Who do these apparitions belong to and why, according to the governess, do the children speak with, but not of, them? Must the governess protect Flora and Miles from these demons, or must the children be protected from her insanity.--Submitted by Luis R. Garza.

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Around the fire on Christmas Eve an anonymous narrator describes a group of friends sharing ghost stories to keep them occupied. One of the guests starts telling their story about a governess thought to be followed by supernatural visitors, which she thought they were ghosts. Those ghosts were only seen by the two kids in the residence, Miles ten years old, and his sister Flora who was two years younger. As the story goes along, the Governess starts to see changes around the kids and the house. She starts spotting ghosts around the house indicating her of events that could or will occur to the children. Many questions start to pop up and no one can answer them clearly, one thing is that tragedy will struck at one point. This book will leave the readers mesmerized with the twists that can occur.--Submitted by Anonymous10.

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