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Delta40
12-27-2010, 07:50 PM
What is your opinion of erotic literature? I have spent an afternoon (and evening) on short-fiction.com.uk exploring the adult themes section. I'm curious about the value of erotic literature and its place. How do other people see it?

While it is good to appreciate good writing, I do wonder what effect the content would have upon me if it was the only genre I read.

MystyrMystyry
12-27-2010, 08:14 PM
Not to sound sexist - but to be honest we are different - I think it's more the thing that separates us.

Women are in tune with their internality and response, which is something men don't notice until they regret ordering the baked salmon

Women (from my limited experience in discussion about it) tend to seek the cleverness in sensual/sexual metaphors, where men read playboy for the issues (an old joke, I know, but I just couldn't resist).

Anyway too much of a good thing can soon become too much of a bad thing, and never vice versa.

Once you've read some erotic literature, and it's taken you to wherever it's supposed to, read some news articles, or watch a movie, or go to a Karaoke club (never know - might meet that special someone who leads to a lifetime of no further need for external onanistic stimulation

Delta40
12-27-2010, 08:20 PM
Do you think erotic literature has a larger female readership?

MystyrMystyry
12-27-2010, 08:56 PM
Probably

(Just privately - I think it has a little to do with women being able to have actual sex whenever they want - but romance, well, how often does Feb 14 roll around?)

But again in a simple romance novel, take Mills and Boon (somebody please take Mills and Boon!) there's more a focus on the romance/chivalry/dark stranger type of 'read a rescuing hero into this fairly blank slate' rather than the actual hot foreplay bits

For that you go up a notch to something with a glossy cover with black background and the author's name writ larger (and gilt) than the publisher's ensign (Bodice Ripper, is it?)

And then there's erotic erotic which is general literature by secretly kinky chicks for secretly kinky chicks with much more of the naughty bits

I don't think women's response to men's 'erotic' litrature would be anything like the same (have studies been done?

If there was a glamour shoot done with Mr Universes in the manner of glamour models, wouldn't it all look a bit iffy? And if it was taken to the next level of porn wouldn't it look as ridiculous - it's just that we're all used to what's dished out, and get lazy or tired of saying 'Not more of this rubbish..!'

Virgil
12-27-2010, 09:52 PM
Do you think erotic literature has a larger female readership?

By far. Men will just go for the porno. :wink5:

Good writing and story telling makes good literature, no matter what the genre. However genre fiction tends to be formulaic and thick with bad writers.

MystyrMystyry
12-27-2010, 10:09 PM
What I said about secretly kinky can equally apply to not-secretly kinky too

I'm just sayin'

MANICHAEAN
12-28-2010, 03:05 AM
I must confess that I enjoy writing stories with a bit of eroticism in them, but I always try to keep it sensual and imaginative as opposed to downright pornagraphic. But then I'm also interested in aspects of; sadness, betrayal and aspirations which are also rich fields for those who want to write.

To a certain extent when writing in the erotic mode there is an element of self-gratification involved, (no pun intended.) But likewise if you can, for example, introduce humour into a story & enjoy it, you hope the reader will see the irony as well.

The points made regards the different gender perspectives on eroticism can open up a whole new ball game. I'm assurred that those of the male persuasion gravitate towards the purely physical, whilist women will look for feelings expressed in your eyes and for the warmth in your personality. If so, I've met some exceptions in my time (on the female side I might add).

I find some of D.H.Lawrence's work erotic, "The Rainbow" for instance, but not "Lady Chatterly." Raymond Chandler's short, snappy, unfulfilled, hands off approach to erotic dames make me smile, whilst Ian Fleming's functional babes leave me dead!

blazeofglory
12-28-2010, 03:24 AM
Erotic literature has a world of its own and it is a personal domain and dosucssion on that needs to be censored since the forum is for all ages and any erotic materlails will create havocs.

I have read some erotic literature, for instance Lalita and I do admit that this is a good piece of litwerature and Nabakov had the book full of eloquent expressions yet I do not think the book is proper for boys under 18, though plenty of children might have read the book. It is not recommenrable as far as children are concerned

MANICHAEAN
12-28-2010, 09:00 AM
Haribol Jee,
Kina tapai ko lekhai paheley ko bhanda pharak cha?
M.

stlukesguild
12-29-2010, 01:59 AM
What qualifies as "Erotic Literature"? W.B. Yeats suggested that sex and death were the only topics worthy of contemplation by the serious mind. I have joked with my studio mates that sex and death divide virtually the whole of art. Of course one assumes that by "sex and death" Yeats meant something far broader... "eros et mort"... "Eros" denoting not merely the act of procreation, but also love, lust, desire, passion, creation, birth, growth... all that is not "Mort" or death, disease, aging, destruction, warfare, disintegration, etc...

It would seem to me that the terms "Erotic Art" and "Erotic Literature" would include all that which celebrate or convey the erotic impulse. By this measure The Song of Songs is erotic literature... as is a great portion of the whole of lyric poetry:

COME live with me and be my Love,
And we will all the pleasures prove
That hills and valleys, dale and field,
And all the craggy mountains yield.

There will we sit upon the rocks
And see the shepherds feed their flocks,
By shallow rivers, to whose falls
Melodious birds sing madrigals.

There will I make thee beds of roses
And a thousand fragrant posies,
A cap of flowers, and a kirtle
Embroider'd all with leaves of myrtle.

A gown made of the finest wool
Which from our pretty lambs we pull,
Fair linèd slippers for the cold,
With buckles of the purest gold.

A belt of straw and ivy buds
With coral clasps and amber studs:
And if these pleasures may thee move,
Come live with me and be my Love.

Thy silver dishes for thy meat
As precious as the gods do eat,
Shall on an ivory table be
Prepared each day for thee and me.

The shepherd swains shall dance and sing
For thy delight each May-morning:
If these delights thy mind may move,
Then live with me and be my Love.

-Christopher Marlowe

Quand vous serez bien vieille, au soir, à la chandelle,
Assise auprès du feu, dévidant et filant,
Direz, chantant mes vers, en vous émerveillant :
Ronsard me célébrait du temps que j’étais belle.

Lors, vous n’aurez servante oyant telle nouvelle,
Déjà sous le labeur à demi sommeillant,
Qui au bruit de mon nom ne s’aille réveillant,
Bénissant votre nom de louange immortelle.

Je serai sous la terre et fantôme sans os :
Par les ombres myrteux je prendrai mon repos :
Vous serez au foyer une vieille accroupie,

Regrettant mon amour et votre fier dédain.
Vivez, si m’en croyez, n’attendez à demain :
Cueillez dès aujourd’hui les roses de la vie

-Pierre de Ronsard

Viens, mon beau chat, sur mon coeur amoureux;
Retiens les griffes de ta patte,
Et laisse-moi plonger dans tes beaux yeux,
Mêlés de métal et d'agate.

Lorsque mes doigts caressent à loisir
Ta tête et ton dos élastique,
Et que ma main s'enivre du plaisir
De palper ton corps électrique,

Je vois ma femme en esprit. Son regard,
Comme le tien, aimable bête
Profond et froid, coupe et fend comme un dard,

Et, des pieds jusques à la tête,
Un air subtil, un dangereux parfum
Nagent autour de son corps brun.

— Charles Baudelaire

By similar standards, most art critics would consider this to be erotic art:

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5246/5302482402_3de846d3f3_z.jpg

The painting clearly celebrates the voluptuous and sensuous beauty of a woman who glows in a glorious bloom of rich colors. The sitter was the sister of Ruben's future wife, and many have imagined that such a visual feast must surely reveal something deeper... perhaps an unacknowledged affair? Yet even if no such thing ever occurred... or was even thought of... the painting is undoubtedly infused with the spirit of Eros.

The same is true of this painting by Rembrandt:

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5282/5301889417_594f51afda_z.jpg

By today's standards the image is rather chaste. Rembrandt's mistress (and wife to be) Hendrickje Stoffels wades in a stream hiking up her dressing gown to reveal her legs. The painting clearly a paean to the woman he loves... far more affectionate... rapturous... and in many ways far more "erotic" than a far more blatantly sexualized image such as this painting by Bronzino:

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5284/5301889487_f646795b49_z.jpg

Considering Eros and the erotic in a broader sense, it becomes obvious that a great portion of the whole of art qualifies as a celebration of the erotic. It also becomes clear that what is deemed "erotic" and what is considered taboo or prohibited varies from culture to culture and era to era. The Japanese Shunga prints of the 16th-19th centuries are often quite explicit... even "pornographic" by Western standards... and yet often exquisitely beautiful works of art, as in this example... one of the most sensitive and least graphic... by the artist, Utamaro:

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5001/5301889567_dce48e97f0_b.jpg

Yet the nude, a staple of Western art, is rarely ever seen in Japanese art. Not because the Japanese found the nude to be taboo... but rather because they did not associate nudity with sex or eroticism. The erotic was far more associated with the beautiful, flowing, and disheveled robes... tangled hair... something that would have been well understood by Robert Herrick:

WHENAS in silks my Julia goes,
Then, then, methinks, how sweetly flows
That liquefaction of her clothes.

Next, when I cast mine eyes and see
That brave vibration each way free ;
O how that glittering taketh me !

A SWEET disorder in the dress
Kindles in clothes a wantonness :
A lawn about the shoulders thrown
Into a fine distraction :
An erring lace which here and there
Enthrals the crimson stomacher :
A cuff neglectful, and thereby
Ribbons to flow confusedly :
A winning wave (deserving note)
In the tempestuous petticoat :
A careless shoe-string, in whose tie
I see a wild civility :
Do more bewitch me than when art
Is too precise in every part.

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5165/5301972871_02599c0273.jpg

The nape of the woman's neck was another erotic image to the Japanese...

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5241/5301889611_e54c56196c.jpg

...as were discarded clothes... that suggested love-making was going on somewhere just out of view:

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5090/5302640536_fbcca30f1c_b.jpg

The image of tangled hair was so connected with passion that the great Japanese poetess, Akiko Yosan used it as the title (Tangled Hair) for her daring book of poems which celebrated erotic passion and sexuality from a woman's point of view:

Fragrant the lillies
in this room of love
hair unbound
I fear
the pink of night's passing

Hair all tangle this morning
shall I smooth it
with spring rain
dripping from the jet-black
wings of swallows?

In India, the Hindu paintings and sculpture of the classical period commonly celebrate the voluptuous, serpentine bodies... both male and female:

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5045/5302593550_89c823f95d_z.jpg

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5123/5302000463_08dabc97fa_b.jpg

Perhaps most disorienting to Western viewers are the Mathuna or "loving couples" found on any number of Hindu temples which quite often are blatantly explicit in their lovemaking... on the exterior of temples where a Western viewer might expect the image of a clothed saint... or at worst, a naked sinner confined to hell. (Again one of the less explicit examples):

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5128/5302482700_10f83e033c_b.jpg

One can imagine, however, William Blake being enthralled by such work, and the great art historian/cultural critic, Sir Kenneth Clark would have also nodded in agreement, having proclaimed that the desire to clutch and be united with another human being was such a central part of our very being, it became hypocrisy to deny as much in our art. As such, one wonders why art history and literary criticism downplay this very element.

MystyrMystyry
12-29-2010, 05:07 AM
Good evening.
The last scene was interesting from the point of view of a professional logician because it contained a number of logical fallacies; that is, invalid propositional constructions and syllogistic forms, of the type so often committed by my wife. "All wood burns," states Sir Bedevere. "Therefore," he concludes, "all that burns is wood." This is, of course, pure bull****. Universal affirmatives can only be partially converted: all of Alma Cogan is dead, but only some of the class of dead people are Alma Cogan. "Oh yes," one would think.

However, my wife does not understand this necessary limitation of the conversion of a proposition; consequently, she does not understand me. For how can a woman expect to appreciate a professor of logic, if the simplest cloth-eared syllogism causes her to flounder.

For example, given the premise, "all fish live underwater" and "all mackerel are fish", my wife will conclude, not that "all mackerel live underwater", but that "if she buys kippers it will not rain", or that "trout live in trees", or even that "I do not love her any more." This she calls "using her intuition". I call it "crap", and it gets me very *irritated* because it is not logical.

"There will be no supper tonight," she will sometimes cry upon my return home. "Why not?" I will ask. "Because I have been screwing the milkman all day," she will say, quite oblivious of the howling error she has made. "But," I will wearily point out, "even given that the activities of screwing the milkman and getting supper are mutually exclusive, now that the screwing is over, surely then, supper may, logically, be got." "You don't love me any more," she will now often postulate. "If you did, you would give me one now and again, so that I would not have to rely on that emaciated Pakistani for my orgasms." "I will give you one after you have got me my supper," I now usually scream, "but not before" -- as you understand, making her bang contingent on the arrival of my supper.

"God, you turn me on when you're angry, you ancient brute!" she now mysteriously deduces, forcing her sweetly throbbing tongue down my throat. "**** supper!" I now invariably conclude, throwing logic somewhat joyously to the four winds, and so we thrash about on our milk-stained floor, transported by animal passion, until we sink back, exhausted, onto the cartons of yoghurt.

I'm afraid I seem to have strayed somewhat from my original brief. But in a nutshell:

Sex is more fun than logic -- one cannot prove this, but it "is" in the same sense that Mount Everest "is", or that Alma Cogan "isn't".

Goodnight.

blazeofglory
12-29-2010, 05:40 AM
Haribol Jee,
Kina tapai ko lekhai paheley ko bhanda pharak cha?
M.

Ma alikati Badale hola.

Ramro lagena?

MANICHAEAN
12-29-2010, 07:28 AM
This Forum is for “Serious Discussion Only”, and yet it has disintegrated utterly & deliciously, as it jumps effortlessly between: Mills & Boon, kinky endeavours of a shady & unspecified nature, recommended reading for young people in Katmandu, paintings by Rembrandt & a professor’s dilemma regards his wife’s logical dalliances with milkmen & an emaciated Pakistani! If there are writers out there looking for inspiration, look no further!

Blaze Namaskar
Mailey 20 barsha Nepaliharu ko nagik basera kaam gareko chu ra tehi bata ali Nepali sekeko.
M.

Patrick_Bateman
12-29-2010, 07:38 AM
I have a Henry Miller book. That's about it.

blazeofglory
12-29-2010, 07:55 AM
This Forum is for “Serious Discussion Only”, and yet it has disintegrated utterly & deliciously, as it jumps effortlessly between: Mills & Boon, kinky endeavours of a shady & unspecified nature, recommended reading for young people in Katmandu, paintings by Rembrandt & a professor’s dilemma regards his wife’s logical dalliances with milkmen & an emaciated Pakistani! If there are writers out there looking for inspiration, look no further!

Blaze Namaskar
Mailey 20 barsha Nepaliharu ko nagik basera kaam gareko chu ra tehi bata ali Nepali sekeko.
M.

Dherai Ramro.

Namaskar!

Delta40
12-29-2010, 07:58 AM
Does this help the discussion at all?

Responses to Reading Erotic Stories:
Male-Female Differences 1
Gunter Schmidt, Ph.D., 2 Volkmar Sigusch, M.D., 2 and Siegrid Schiifer, M.D. 2

In individual sessions, 120 female and 120 male students read one of two stories
in which the sexual experience of a young couple was described. The stories
differed in the degree to which affection was expressed. The results were as
follows: (lj On the average, the stories were rated as "moderately sexually
arousing. " (2) The emotional reactions during and to a lesser degree in the 24 hr
after the experiment may be described as general activation, an increase of"
emotional instability, and avoidance reactions. {3)Most of the subfects registered
sexual-physiological reactions in the genital region during the experiment.
(4) In the 24 hr period following the experiment, there was a slight to moderate
activation of sexual behavior, sexual fantasy, and sexual drive. (5} With reference
to all measured responses, only slight sex differences were found. Compared
to men, women displayed significantly less emotional activation and significantly
greater emotional instability and avoidance. Coital activity and sexual drive were
significantly more increased among women than among men during the 24 hr
following the experiment. (6) The type of story has only a very slight influence
on the measured responses. This is true for both men and women.

MystyrMystyry
12-29-2010, 08:31 AM
The points made regards the different gender perspectives on eroticism can open up a whole new ball game.


You're not going to try tell us that one was unintentional..?

MystyrMystyry
12-29-2010, 09:24 AM
Does this help the discussion at all?

Responses to Reading Erotic Stories:
Male-Female Differences 1
Gunter Schmidt, Ph.D., 2 Volkmar Sigusch, M.D., 2 and Siegrid Schiifer, M.D. 2




It doesn't help much at all because:

1) the selected age group is probably full of rampant raging hormones anyway (11 - 111)

2) the slected age group don't tell the truth about anything personal on anonymous tests

3) the test subjects have more than likely other stresses in their lives ('will I make it to the bar on time before 'she of dreams' finishes her waitressing shift?)

4) it doesn't actually explain the quality of the writing and to what degree the 'criteria' of eroticism was met


Put simply the Masters and Johnson sexual response tests of the '60's were effectively fabricated because the subjects were more turned on by the amount of money they were being paid than caring about what the researchers were actually 'looking for' - they guessed what they thought were the things they wanted to hear

You could only do a test amongst a new testtube created species of humans that have had all accepted 'human qualities' ironed out


Why not just ask 'Psst! What gets yer knickers wet, Love?' at the local post office and expect them to tell you publicly - you'd get as accurate a test result as by any other means

Delta40
12-29-2010, 09:37 AM
Someone stated earlier that erotic literature was more stimulating for women than men. Are you saying this study is nothing but bosh because you don't believe it or do you have evidence that shows otherwise?

Story I of the test contained pure hard core sex interaction. Story II contained sex interaction with affection.

Immediately upon having read the story, subjects evaluated on 9-point
scales how strongly they were stimulated and whether the story had created a
favorable response.
The mean stimulation ratings for men and women varied between 5.2 and
6.0 (Table Ill); thus the subjects described their own sexual arousal as somewhat
greater than "moderate."
The men listed somewhat higher arousal rates than did the women, and
story lI (with affection) was described by both the men and the women as being
more stimulating. According to a 2 × 2 analysis of variance (Table III), the sex
difference was not significant; the effect of the stories reached no more than a
10% level of significance. The interaction of sex and type of story was also
insignificant. Thus it is not provable that the influence of the type of story varies
for men and women. The variable "affection - without affection" in the stories
had roughly the same significance for sexual arousal for both sexes.

MystyrMystyry
12-29-2010, 10:07 AM
I'm just not really into taking dodgy statistics into serious consideration at any level.

You're a poet, why not write some gooey stuff and see what sort of responses you get over your other stuff? And then turn up the heat? And then a little more?

It has to be a more honest way of discerning the truth for youself

When I was a 11-25ish I thought about sex every 1.342 seconds an average, though I'm not sure I want to disclose the current frequency (who knows who might be listening?)

So does a bunch of test subjects whose lives are currently in a state of flux (who are turned on by the thought that someone of the opposite sex who had just glanced in their direction had suddenly dropped their pencil), when asked if a pair of similar stories that feature their favorite subject matter, have some bearing on their sexual responsiveness?

If they'd asked me I probably would've said 'It couldn't hurt it'

blazeofglory
12-29-2010, 12:09 PM
In fact when it comes to erotic things it is men who always act and women mostly react.


Although the effect of any act on woman is deeper and intenser but they are sluggards. At times they are starters but mostly they satisfy themselves by reacting.

But love when it is acted upon is really intense and they take it deeply

Men can have sex without passion and love but in most women' cases it is unthinkable.

Woman wants more love than sex

MystyrMystyry
12-29-2010, 09:35 PM
I think everyone wants more love than sex, but they also want love and sex, sexy love, lovely sex, funny love, sexy fun, funny sex, lovely funny sex, funny sexy love etc etc etc

blazeofglory
12-30-2010, 01:53 AM
Eroticism has great grips on all and we cannot kind of avert it nor can we distance ourselves from thinking about it no matter how much we try to be yogic or spiritual.

Here the issue is to make it a creative journey through it

Lote-Tree
01-24-2011, 12:05 PM
Yes. Love eroticism. Specially in pictorial form ;-)

SilentMute
02-12-2011, 10:11 PM
I've read some S&M literature--yes, I know I don't look like the type:svengo:...and yes, my mother is aware of it. I have a very adventurous fantasy life, which has never went further than my thoughts. This is a discussion for another thread--but it is possible, believe it or not, to have dirty thoughts and a pure life.

Most of the S&M literature I have read seems to be geared towards women, though that maybe just because of the titles I pick. I generally prefer books where women are submissive--or if they are being dominant, it is over another woman. There are, of course, books about women dominating men--but these are a turn off for me. In books where women dominate men, the women tend to be surly and not into completely satisfying the man...which is interesting, because I don't tend to find that in the male counterparts. Men dominating women--well, sometimes they are rude, though not usually...and the woman will always be satisfied at the end, even if they tease her at the beginning.

I have been surprised at how something that initially repulses you can start arousing you at some point. In S&M literature, this happens frequently. Initially, you just think it is about whips and bondage--and often you are exposed to some bizarre practice that will initially nauseate you. I've actually learned alot about myself by reading erotic literature. Our sexuality can reveal a lot about our upbringing, our insecurities, our fears, our prejudices--because sex often is an expression of all of that. In fact, I sometimes think it is a good idea--for that reason--to have premarital sex to find out if your mate has some issues. A friend of mine once told me her husband would get angry and stop having sex if she talked or made any sound at all. She found out years later that he had been sexually abused by his mother as a child, and he thought when a woman talked to him during sex...she was trying to manipulate him. Needless to say, though, this was not a happy marriage.

I enjoy reading an occasional erotic book. Sexual release is a good remedy for stress, and I don't always feel like being profound and reading philosophy or a great work of literature. However, I do not think that it is healthy to limit your interests, literature, movies, etc. solely on the erotic genre.

And as always, a person has to apply common sense, morals, and obey laws with sex as with everything else. You have to understand that there are some things that should be left to fantasy. Some of the practices I have read in my books are dangerous, like suffocation. Rape fantasies are very common--but of course, this is both morally wrong and criminal.

Sex is one of those things that people have a problem taking responsibility for--men and women. We can control our sex drive--and if you can't, you need psychiatric help. Seeing something that sexually stimulates us should not make us behave immorally or unlawfully. If I saw a handsome man walking naked down my street--even if he was flirting with me, and I was attracted--I would not justify shoving a pole up his nether regions by saying he was asking for it (this is assuming that it is a rape).

I may have gotten a little off topic, but I was responding to is whether reading erotic literature is damaging. I do not think so if the person takes responsibility for their actions, is moral, law-abiding, and doesn't suffer from a mental disorder. Also, erotic literature should not be read by people who are not adults--since young people have not fully developed their morals or even understand the full consequences of their behavior. I think mixing mind altering substances--like alcohol and drugs--with sex is a bad idea too.

But of course, there always is going to be your bad apples that blame pornography on their desire to kill hookers or something. If it isn't that, it is playing some Goth music backwards or something. However, people need to realize that a sociopath could find a reason to kill if they watched Sesame Street. They are damaged--it isn't the fault of whatever they claim made them kill or what they liked.

janeeyre88
02-16-2011, 02:42 PM
Though I don't mind some eroticism in books, I think I prefer a nice sweet love story. I have read some erotic books that I have liked as it fit the love story I was reading. It had it's place and would have been better with it in than out. I do believe a love story does not have to have eroticism in it to be seductive and stimulating though.

Cunninglinguist
02-20-2011, 12:11 AM
It's funny... I bet we would never fall in love if we never read about it.

Revolte
02-21-2011, 04:47 AM
I LOVE to read stuff about sex and sexuality, and or stuff with sex and sexuality. However, there is something that feels very corny when I pass through the store and look at those books, I just don't believe it.

Delta40
02-21-2011, 07:31 AM
I enjoy the forums that have erotic writers, chiefly because I'm curious about writing styles. As in the short story section on Lit-Net, one can make a clear distinction between writing skills as well as the varied devices used. It is no different in erotic literature, I assume except perhaps greater focus is placed on the erotic content where, I notice, the story itself often peters out. I am aware that some readers think who cares about the details, lets get to the sex bits but there are others who seek to be fulfilled not just at the erotic level. I really enjoy a well rounded story, the plot, the characters the eroticism and the climax (no pun intended) I suppose, while we can snigger at it, erotic literature is a genre all its own. Secondly, I like the way erotic literature makes me feel.

I have a friend who considers himself rather highbrow. He spends an incredible amount of time 'researching' for media and art purposes, porn and erotic literature. Apparently it is for no other reason than that. He produces nothing other than the occasional art work but spends the rest of his time exploring the deep self and the relationship to any amount of things. All rather tiresome to me when I think despite his facade, he is just a randy bloke getting his thrills via the internet.

What do others think? Am I being cynical or is intellect as good as an old newspaper to hide the jerking off element of erotica?

soundofmusic
02-21-2011, 07:36 AM
Hum...how dirty does it have to be before it is erotic....I mean, I get pretty buzzed on Twilight:drool5::lol:

stlukesguild
02-21-2011, 10:23 PM
William Gass spoke on the issue of eroticism in literature, declaring:

"True sexuality in literature... sex as a positive aesthetic
quality... lies not in any scene or subject, nor in the mere
appearance of a 'vulgar' word, but in the consequences on the
page of love well made---made to the medium which is the writer's
own."

In other words, eroticism should be approached by the artist as he or she might approach any other subject. Nearly any subject can become bland, vulgar, cliche... in the hand of the wrong artist. Without the proper mastery of the formal elements of art... without the sense of love well made to the language or medium... any subject may fall flat... strike as pretentious, crude, empty, kitsch, etc...

Sir Kenneth Clark, the art historian, suggested that as a central part of our being as humans, the subject was so emotionally-laden that it is often difficult to offer an objective critical response. Those who are uncomfortable with sexuality will be repulsed by any artistic portrayal of what they feel should be left hidden and private, while others, at the opposite end of the spectrum, may be seduced by the subject in spite of the vacuousness of the actual artistic expression. Clark suggested, however, that art can be quite explicit and still achieve the highest level of artistic expression (as the erotic temple sculptures in India or some of the finest Ukiyo-e prints of Japan prove). In literature, one might surely discover any number of examples of the erotic... again ranging from the mere suggestion to the most explicit descriptions.

Jozanny
02-22-2011, 12:34 PM
I enjoy reading porn, primarily soft, as a humorous release. I find it funny more than offensive because the only story really is the depiction, but really good erotica saddens me and leaves me frustrated. I miss my bad sex life, and I am too symptomatic to go in search of resuming it.

That said, I don't like modern romance, and don't read much erotica as a genre, though I will snoop in homoerotica. Not too much, but the difficult, tortured stuff, after Forster.

JuniperWoolf
02-23-2011, 12:18 PM
The only thing that I own which could be considered "erotic literature" (despite how much the author hates the wishy-washey term) is Lost Girls, but that might be more honestly called "hardest of harcore graphic porn with clever speech bubbles sketched in."

OrphanPip
02-23-2011, 03:10 PM
The only thing that I own which could be considered "erotic literature" (despite how much the author hates the wishy-washey term) is Lost Girls, but that might be more honestly called "hardest of harcore graphic porn with clever speech bubbles sketched in."

Ha there are a lot of places where that book is illegal.

Delta40
02-23-2011, 05:26 PM
I was outraged at Lady Chatterley's Lover when I read it as a teen. Gosh it made my cheeks glow beetroot red on the bus to school. Now, it seems like some dog eared paperback with absolutely no value.

Revolte
02-25-2011, 06:01 AM
Ha there are a lot of places where that book is illegal.

is this like.... what did with the movie patch adams, but in book form, of the lost boys?

MsSilentia
02-27-2011, 06:16 PM
I seldom care for texts about sex, but I like them about sexuality. I have read some very explicit erotic narratives and they seemed quite boring. The most I got from them was a feeling of exhaustion. I remember reading Jean Auel’s second book and when I came to the erotic parts I was most like “Will you be done soon?”. I refuse to believe this is something only about me.

But then I have read some narratings from a Norwegian writer, Margit Sandemo, who is hardly even translated into English. She was for many years producing a series of novels quite slovenly written but still… the erotic narratives in that suite were brave in a different way and I liked them better than more well-worked texts. She did not write about the acting of two young, healthy, beautiful sex-athletics left alone to use their time.
Instead she wrote about the nervous bride-groom who was a little too “hasty” on the wedding-night or about the rachitic bride, panicking for her miss-shaped legs.
There was a story about a man in a declined state of asbestos, having an affair with a girl who, in the middle of the sex-act was afraid he would start to cough.
Another man, a miner in seventeenth century, who had a fear that the years in the mine might have made him impotent and was scared as hell for finding out.
One story was about the conflict a girl experienced, coming of age in a society, hostile towards female sexuality.
And so on...

There were dreams and fantasies and shame and sometimes painful issues on responsibility. Her approach was usually to show people when most vulnerable. Sexuality was an immense power that might compromise people and leave them naked - and still the power of life itself. And I loved that approach.

Anyone having anything to recommend?

Buh4Bee
03-08-2011, 09:15 PM
I was outraged at Lady Chatterley's Lover when I read it as a teen. Gosh it made my cheeks glow beetroot red on the bus to school. Now, it seems like some dog eared paperback with absolutely no value.

Funny Delta, I just finished reading Lady Chatterley's Lover and I practically had to get a fan out to keep from blushing too much. My husband came into the bedroom and I snorted a nasally, "WHAT? I'm reading." I thought I was experiencing early menopause; the room heated up so much during those erotic parts. I guess I don't read enough modern erotic novels. :nonod:

Delta40
03-08-2011, 11:55 PM
lol. We women glow at all ages.....

cmwalters
05-01-2012, 12:59 AM
hello everyone
check out my new page and I am rewriting all my sci-fi/horror
short stories and put up more stuff on my favorites gallery to
check out if you are into sci-fi/horror...

the page is

http://cmwalters.deviantart.com

It is all REPTILE VORE so be aware of that and some of the swallowing of humans
is a bit graphic and detailed..especially Jennifer's death in the part 1 of Short Story
#3..I will be rewriting all 25 short stories from the last page with more details,info
and it will be a lot better than the originals so be patient while I rewrite them

cmwalters
05-01-2012, 01:08 AM
I been writing for about 3 years now including these 25 short stories
and it is a hobby thing for me to do and so you know I'm 51 years old
and work at the Home Goods store!

tonywalt
05-01-2012, 02:10 PM
I only rarely read erotic literature, as visual stimulus is a virtual necessity in these matters. Erotic content certainly does not add much to a book that I am interested, it's good to keep the cerebral and sexual in separate compartments when reading - for the most part.

But in absence of x.cominternet site(made up site), I would say that erotic literature would be as filling as a nice salad with lite Italian dressing - keeping me alive, but not that full feeling as when it splashes across the screen or ideally across your bedroom...

Buh4Bee
05-01-2012, 08:08 PM
Sounds more like a pent-up eruption! :eek:

osho
05-02-2012, 01:19 AM
I have not read erotic literature except for a few classics since the region I live in has no bookshops or libraries that shelve such books. But I have read the kind available on the internet. I as a teenager never had read such books since I was grew in a very strict society wherein even talking to a lady in private is tabooed, let alone dating them. I have never dated a woman and had no premarital experience, and I have seen the nether of a woman when I was in the thirties. My naivety is disgusting. I do not think I am chaste, when I remain unsexed up to my matrimonial day, a virgin. I do not know she too was a virgin and I do not care. Maybe this was a primitive mindset and I am somewhat backward and immature. Without the knowledge of sex one is a simpleton, the kind who can b cheated on. The world has changed a lot and our time is changing fast and with the Internet eroticism has spread like a wildfire and to ignore it is to step back civilizationally. Today' generations have access to all kinds of information and to censor such sources and information pools is a stupid idea. One has a freewill, as biblical societies claim and one must take the responsibility if he or she transcend the limits set by our guardians

cacian
05-02-2012, 02:35 AM
Do you think erotic literature has a larger female readership?

Hi Delta40 I can assure it does nothave my readership solely because it feels rather too pushed/forced if you like.
In other words it does have that natural feel to it because I comes across to me as an exageration of words and meanings. It does not seem real.
I think the way I see it there are things that visuals, others that are theoritical and some are just individualistic or private.
Mine fits the last description.

Helga
05-02-2012, 08:51 AM
I don't think I have read that much erotic literature, I tend to be a bit of a prude when it comes to stuff like this. But since I am trying to get over that silly block in my head I spent about 70 minuets a few days ago reading a book called 'The story of the eye' by Georges Bataille... it wasn't erotic per se, but it had A LOT of sex in it, and it's been about 10 days since I read it and I can't eat eggs.

that being said, I don't think there is anything wrong with erotic books but it does annoy me a bit when people tell me they read a lot and it turns out they only read the red series.

JuniperWoolf
05-02-2012, 09:03 AM
'The story of the eye' by Georges Bataille... it wasn't erotic per se, but it had A LOT of sex in it, and it's been about 10 days since I read it and I can't eat eggs.

Well, that's intriguing - in what way does it eroticize eggs?

BienvenuJDC
05-02-2012, 09:40 AM
Well, that's intriguing - in what way does it eroticize eggs?

I was wondering the same thing? Intrigued actually.

stlukesguild
05-02-2012, 10:27 AM
Trust me... you don't want to know. Just think Bill Clinton and cigars.:eek::yikes:

stlukesguild
05-02-2012, 10:31 AM
I think the way I see it there are things that visuals, others that are theoritical and some are just individualistic or private.

That is fine for you... but I don't think I'd like to see you in any position of power. I'm not at all fond of censorship. Sexuality in all its various manifestations has long been one of the central themes of art. If we eliminated Eros from art we'd certainly eliminate nearly half of the paintings in existence.

tonywalt
05-02-2012, 11:40 AM
Sounds more like a pent-up eruption! :eek:

You had me at Eruption!

Helga
05-02-2012, 11:53 AM
Well, that's intriguing - in what way does it eroticize eggs?

you just have to read it to find out, but if you like eggs then just let it go.

Alexander III
05-02-2012, 12:52 PM
Well, that's intriguing - in what way does it eroticize eggs?

Well eggs fit rather conveniently into many orifices of the female and male body.

My cousin works as a volunteer with the ambulance in Milan and you would be surprised at how many things people accidentally have inserted into them.

At a recent party in university, a group of fellows had stolen a small bust of some man from the 18th century (an assumption made from his hairstyle and mode of dress) and a girl tried to shove it up her intimates, she failed but the attempt was both admirable, inspiring and profoundly disgusting. (Yes english universities, have entered into a beautiful period of decadence)

Helga
05-02-2012, 02:09 PM
Well eggs fit rather conveniently into many orifices of the female and male body.

My cousin works as a volunteer with the ambulance in Milan and you would be surprised at how many things people accidentally have inserted into them.



they do a bit more in this book