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oshima
11-13-2010, 02:17 PM
So, after watching his documentaries Grizzly Man and Wheel of Time, I wanted to see some of his older films, especially after a friend was describing to me what went down during the filming of Fitzcaraldo. After watching that film, as well as The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser and so far the my favorite Aguirre: Wrath of God, I am impressed. I have trouble articulating what makes these films so compelling and hynotic, but I suppose it's the feeling that, despite the fact that these films are fiction narritive, they seem to be trying to use the film medium to capture something primal and present in human nature. The penetrating curiousity of his camera...I suppose thats whats compelling.

Anyway...I didn't find a Herzog thread so here it is.:hurray:

DanielBenoit
12-14-2010, 12:04 PM
Werner Herzog's early documentary about the deaf-blind In the Land of Silence and Darkness is one of the ten or so greatest films I've ever seen. Somehow the film conveys detachment, pathos, metaphysical consideration and Herzogian surreralism in almost every frame.

I also love his other two classics, Strozeck and Aguiree, the former, an excellent meditation on America, and the latter, on colonialism.

weltanschauung
12-14-2010, 01:15 PM
oh dude, you have to watch this:
http://i643.photobucket.com/albums/uu159/whattheheck_album/Cover%20Images/LiebPoster.jpg

oshima
01-19-2011, 07:33 PM
Holy mother of existentialism, I don't even want to know what Mein Liebster Feind is even about, I just want to get a hold of it and watch. Thanks, weltanschauung. D.B., have seen Aguire and it's one of my favorites. I wonder though, do you feel was really about colonialism? I got the sense, like most of Herzog's films, the colonialism was more a vehicle to compare the idea of civilization against a kind of deep seated primal sense that's above (or below) even a lust for violence. Though definitely it has some sort of commentary, even if by proxy, on colonialism itself. Also, will definitely check out In the Land of Silence and Darkness.

DanielBenoit
01-19-2011, 09:00 PM
I wonder though, do you feel was really about colonialism? I got the sense, like most of Herzog's films, the colonialism was more a vehicle to compare the idea of civilization against a kind of deep seated primal sense that's above (or below) even a lust for violence. Though definitely it has some sort of commentary, even if by proxy, on colonialism itself. Also, will definitely check out In the Land of Silence and Darkness.

That's certainly an interpretation that is more common to Herzog's career as a whole. I would say that while Aguiree isn't really a film about colonialism as say Sembene's films are about post-colonialism, for the natives in the film are purely uncanny forces of nature and not focused on as specific peoples. Instead Herzog focuses on the almost satirical nature of these Spanish colonialists; one of the films most darkly satirical scenes is one in which Aguiree maps out a whole expanse of the river, blind and arrogant enough to believe that he actually has godly control over it while in reality his crew is on the verge of mutiny and there are all trapped in the middle of the wilderness on a pitiful little raft.

I would say that Herzog's film depicts the collapse of Eurocentric colonialist sensibilities which declared that Europe could conquer the world with a simple sweep of its hand. The final shot of the film mocks such a notion as we see Aguiree declaring himself to be God as he stands amongst the corpses of his dead crew, already killed off by diseases and starvation. It is a very dark mockery of colonialist attitudes.

weltanschauung
01-20-2011, 05:16 PM
Holy mother of existentialism, I don't even want to know what Mein Liebster Feind is even about, I just want to get a hold of it and watch. Thanks, weltanschauung. D.B., have seen Aguire and it's one of my favorites. I wonder though, do you feel was really about colonialism? I got the sense, like most of Herzog's films, the colonialism was more a vehicle to compare the idea of civilization against a kind of deep seated primal sense that's above (or below) even a lust for violence. Though definitely it has some sort of commentary, even if by proxy, on colonialism itself. Also, will definitely check out In the Land of Silence and Darkness.

its a documentary about klaus kinski, total death ****ing krieg uber alles
http://l.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/i/mesg/emoticons7/3.gif

Mutatis-Mutandis
01-20-2011, 05:27 PM
This is a filmmaker I never have gotten into. Not because I dislike his films, but because I haven't seen any. Didn't he make one about hauling a boat over a mountain or something? That looked interesting, to say the least.

weltanschauung
01-20-2011, 05:35 PM
fitzcarraldo, its a great movie.

DanielBenoit
01-20-2011, 08:34 PM
This is a filmmaker I never have gotten into. Not because I dislike his films, but because I haven't seen any. Didn't he make one about hauling a boat over a mountain or something? That looked interesting, to say the least.

Herzog's Best Films IMHO

1. The Land of Silence and Darkness (1971)
2. Stoszek (1977)
3. Aguiree, The Wrath of God (1972)
4. Gesualdo: Death for Five Voices (1995)
5. Fitzcarraldo (1982)
6. Encounters at the End of the World (2007)
7. La Soufriere (1977)
8. Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans (2009)
9. My Son, My Son What Have Ye Done? (2009)
10. Ten Thousand Years Older (2002)

Tallon
01-21-2011, 11:07 PM
He is a great character, i recommend you learn about the man, he has had a crazy life.

Once while my favourite film critic was reviewing him he was shot by an air rifle in the groin, he said it "was not a significant bullet" and carried on with the interview while the critic was running away hahaha.

weltanschauung
01-22-2011, 12:10 PM
http://www.horrordvds.com/reviews/n-z/nosferatu79/nosferatu79_shot7l.jpg

Ayahuasca
07-07-2011, 11:14 AM
Herzog is amazing. Aguirre is a beautiful movie, featuring arguably the best juxtaposition of music and imagery this side of Clint Mansell.

Ecurb
07-11-2011, 03:04 PM
I wrote a review of "Cave of Forgotten Dreams" on this very page. Like most Herzog movies, it's well worth seeing (and it's in theaters now)!