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Patrick_Bateman
10-30-2010, 09:03 AM
it needs a thread really.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gFMWXF4FTnE

YesNo
10-30-2010, 10:26 AM
Funny!

Patrick_Bateman
10-30-2010, 10:27 AM
Frasier is the greatest comedy ever not named Blackadder

Gilliatt Gurgle
10-30-2010, 10:37 PM
Patrick,

Like you, my wife and I enjoyed Frasier quite a lot. In fact, my son who was less than ten at the time it was airing, got a few laughs at the show.

One of the few newer TV shows that we could enjoy along with "Everybody Loves Raymond".


.

Lokasenna
10-31-2010, 04:34 AM
Frasier is the greatest comedy ever not named Blackadder

Hmm... not sure I agree with that one.

Perhaps it's the difference between British and American perspectives, but I find it fairly average. To be fair, it's much better than any other American comedy I've seen, but it falls short of most of the pantheon of British comedy from the last half-century. Though perhaps the Americans here would disagree with me.

loe
10-31-2010, 10:51 AM
Frasier is the greatest comedy ever ...
Sorry, I have to strictly disagree. The best comedy ever was, is and will be the one and only "Cheers". :D
Even Frasier himself was a bit funnier in it than in his own series.

Best regards

Helga
11-02-2010, 04:03 AM
I agree with Loe, Cheers was better by far, but Frasier is very funny and I have recently been re-watching it via internet.... always a good entertainment

Mutatis-Mutandis
11-10-2010, 05:49 PM
Does anyone (or, did anyone) watch the sitcom Frasier? I have always liked the show, but as the years go by, I like how I get more and more of the literature jokes and cultural references. Just yesterday there was a reference to Scheherazade.

Mutatis-Mutandis
11-08-2011, 12:22 AM
I think Frasier really is the funniest American sitcom ever done, aside from Seinfeld. It really got bogged down in the whole Daphne/Niles story line of later seasons. It's a wonderful celebration of high culture, while also justly mocking it. The final season had some hilarious episodes, though. I think Frasier was much funnier, particularly much wittier, than Cheers was.

As to it being better or worse than British comedy . . . I think the two are so different it's hard to even begin to decide definitively which one is "better." Two completely different types of humor. I love both, though.

Also, Lok, have you ever seen an episode of Seinfeld (not from the first or second season, that is)?

JuniperWoolf
11-08-2011, 03:11 AM
Canadian comedy is more British than American, I think. We're big fans of sketches and impossible situations.

Lokasenna
11-08-2011, 05:00 AM
Also, Lok, have you ever seen an episode of Seinfeld (not from the first or second season, that is)?

I haven't, I'm afraid. My housemates had Curb Your Enthusiasm on the TV the other night, which I understand is somehow related to it - I wasn't particularly impressed with the few minutes of it I saw.

JuniperWoolf
11-08-2011, 06:25 AM
I haven't, I'm afraid. My housemates had Curb Your Enthusiasm on the TV the other night, which I understand is somehow related to it - I wasn't particularly impressed with the few minutes of it I saw.

Haha, I think that to most North Americans, the idea of never having seen an episode of Seinfeld is the equivalent of never having seen the sun.

Vonny
11-08-2011, 06:58 AM
Haha, I think that to most North Americans, the idea of never having seen an episode of Seinfeld is the equivalent of never having seen the sun.

I've never seen Seinfeld, Frasier, or Cheers... not one episode.

the equivalent of never having seen the sun?

...hmmm, not in my book!

Mutatis-Mutandis
11-08-2011, 09:42 AM
I haven't, I'm afraid. My housemates had Curb Your Enthusiasm on the TV the other night, which I understand is somehow related to it - I wasn't particularly impressed with the few minutes of it I saw.
I've watched Curb Your Enthusiasm, and I don't get the hype. The main character is just annoying. The only thing it seems to have in common is that absurd situations the main character gets in . . . but the same could be said of almost any American comedy show. Still, check out Seinfeld if you get the chance.

Kramer has to be one of the greatest television characters of all time. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CVA3BLEDIio)

P.S. Check out the very end here (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SlRJkdjmBcM), because it's great and the above clip cuts it off early.

Haha, I think that to most North Americans, the idea of never having seen an episode of Seinfeld is the equivalent of never having seen the sun.
Well, it is pretty hard to avoid, as it's shown multiple times on multiple stations.

YesNo
11-08-2011, 10:10 AM
No one in my family watches television, so I miss most of these unless I pick them up as DVD sets from the library.

Because I recalled people mentioning it in other posts, I checked out a season's worth of the The Big Bang Theory yesterday and found it amusing. South Park and Family Guy are also pretty good. One thing about getting these from the library is you skip the commercials.

TurquoiseSunset
11-08-2011, 10:24 AM
I love Frasier...I even own the whole series. It's probably my favourite American comedy series so far, but I never watched Seinfeld.

Emil Miller
11-08-2011, 11:57 AM
In a lot of British TV comedy sexual innuendo is practically de rigueur, as is seen here in the series 'Allo 'Allo, that ran for quite a while some years ago.

http://youtu.be/C2kgRmECMhs

OrphanPip
11-08-2011, 12:05 PM
I've watched Curb Your Enthusiasm, and I don't get the hype. The main character is just annoying. The only thing it seems to have in common is that absurd situations the main character gets in . . . but the same could be said of almost any American comedy show. Still, check out Seinfeld if you get the chance.


Larry David co-created and wrote most of Seinfeld. I think the humour essentially the same, except David is allowed to be a bit more crude than he could be on network TV. It relies a lot on running jokes.

I like Big Bang Theory, it has grown on me despite not liking it too much at first.

Frasier was kind of meh for me.

I remember Seinfeld used to run in syndication here every day after school on so many channels you could watch it for 2 hours straight.

MarkBastable
11-08-2011, 01:24 PM
Modern Family.

Much as I like Seinfeld, Frasier, King of Queens, Taxi, Curb Your Enthusiasm, The (American) Office and (hip though it ain't) Friends, Modern Family is just brilliantly written, beautifully performed and thematically perfect. And no laughter-track either.

Scheherazade
11-08-2011, 02:05 PM
I still watch the re-runs of "Frasier" in the mornings here in the UK; love it!
In a lot of British TV comedy sexual innuendo is practically de rigueur, as is seen here in the series 'Allo 'Allo, that ran for quite a while some years ago.

http://youtu.be/C2kgRmECMhsI am not familiar with many British comedy shows, I have to admit, but I loved "Coupling", which stopped running after couple of seasons for some reason.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GkU8PAVXo98&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qAUHVLNEh0k&feature=related

Emil Miller
11-08-2011, 04:34 PM
Apart from the sexual angle, WW11 looms large in the British psyche and there have been a number of series in which it features. One of the funniest was 'It Ain't Half Hot Mum' which featured the shenanigans of a forces concert party in Burma.

http://youtu.be/5taNjmGKIdU

Mutatis-Mutandis
11-08-2011, 07:28 PM
I think my favorite British comedy show is Faulty Towers. A close second is, of course, Monty Python, but for all the hilarious skits they did, just as many made me scratch my head. Monty Python and the Holy Grail has to be one of the funniest movies ever made.

And I've yet to watch Modern Family. It's just one of those shows I haven't gotten around to.

MarkBastable
11-08-2011, 07:55 PM
Apart from the sexual angle, WW11 looms large in the British psyche and there have been a number of series in which it features. One of the funniest was 'It Ain't Half Hot Mum' which featured the shenanigans of a forces concert party in Burma.

http://youtu.be/5taNjmGKIdU


I think it looms large in the writing of Perry and Croft, whose experience was there, and they were writing at a time when the audience remembered the war. I'm not sure that's still true, in terms of popular entertainment. I can't think of a comedy based on the Second World War that has been commissioned within the last, say, twenty years.

There's a curve, I think, in popular culture, where a huge event is tragic, then comic, then nostalgic, then irrelevant, then historic. The First World War seems now to be historic - hence Downton Abbey. The Second World War is probably going through its irrelevant phase.

Ecurb
11-08-2011, 08:04 PM
Joe Frazier, who died yesterday, was a great fighter. I'll grant that Ali beat him 2/3, and Foreman destroyed him twice, but nobody else beat him. If those two are the only two guys in the world who can beat you up, you're pretty darned tough.

tonywalt
11-08-2011, 08:30 PM
Actually Frasier and Niles beat the hell out of Frazier. Eddie was barking like crazy.

Mutatis-Mutandis
11-08-2011, 10:32 PM
I think it looms large in the writing of Perry and Croft, whose experience was there, and they were writing at a time when the audience remembered the war. I'm not sure that's still true, in terms of popular entertainment. I can't think of a comedy based on the Second World War that has been commissioned within the last, say, twenty years.

There's a curve, I think, in popular culture, where a huge event is tragic, then comic, then nostalgic, then irrelevant, then historic. The First World War seems now to be historic - hence Downton Abbey. The Second World War is probably going through its irrelevant phase.

I don't know. I think, here in America at least, WWI is in its irrelevant phase, as it has been as long as I can remember. Schools teach way more about WWII than WWI, there's almost always some sort of documentary on it on one of the history/education channels, Hitler and the holocaust are common references, etc. Whereas with WWI, I think it's be quite easy to find multiple 20-somethings who don't even know it was the Germans who caused the trouble.

MarkBastable
11-08-2011, 11:36 PM
I don't know. I think, here in America at least, WWI is in its irrelevant phase, as it has been as long as I can remember. Schools teach way more about WWII than WWI, there's almost always some sort of documentary on it on one of the history/education channels, Hitler and the holocaust are common references, etc. Whereas with WWI, I think it's be quite easy to find multiple 20-somethings who don't even know it was the Germans who caused the trouble.

I think you're right about that. But it was a remote war for you.

Even WWII was not as central, metaphorically and actually, to the US - which was recognised even at the time. The handbook for GIs coming to Britain said, "Back home you were in a country at war. Here in Britain you are in a war zone."

My American wife was astonished when she went to the Imperial War Museum and saw pictures of London during the Blitz. As she said, "Jesus, it was 9/11 every night."

OrphanPip
11-09-2011, 01:59 AM
The first world war had a much bigger impact outside of the USA. For many countries it was like an entire generation of boys had been wiped out. In Canada, 1% of the population at large was killed in the war, with casualty levels comparable to the US's during the war, despite a much smaller population. The countries on the continent suffered even heavier losses.

Historically, I think WW1 has been the more influential war for the British Empire, it put the final nail in the coffin of British Imperialism in Canada, and it created the idea of a Canadian nationality separate from Britain. It created the conditions where Canadians questioned for the first time whether their interest were really perfectly in line with those of the UK, because so many died fighting for what seemed a European problem. Which eventually culminated in the Statute of Westminster in 1933 which severed the final executive ties between Australia, New Zealand, and Canada with the UK.

JuniperWoolf
11-09-2011, 03:14 AM
I like Big Bang Theory, it has grown on me despite not liking it too much at first.

I like that David from Roseanne is in it, the characters are endearing, and I think the tall one is cute, but I HATE the writing. The show basically has one joke, and it's not a good one:

"We're so geeky, isn't it funny? We can write completely witless jokes, because we're just so geeky that we look clever without actually being clever!"
*insert Star Trek reference*
"See? We're geeky, do you get it? Isn't it so smart to like Star Trek?"
*insert comic book reference*
"Do you get how geeky we are yet?"
*insert video games reference*
"In case you haven't noticed yet, we're geeks!"
*insert science reference*

It's like they're trying to make dumb people feel smart by association.

OrphanPip
11-09-2011, 03:27 AM
I think that's probably true for the first season, they have gotten better in later seasons. Lately, I think they have pulled back on those kinds of jokes and put more emphasis on the awkwardness of Sheldon and the sort of bizarre social relations between the characters.

JuniperWoolf
11-09-2011, 03:34 AM
Well THAT would be much better. The characters are solid, but the few episodes that I saw from the first season were pretty annoying.

TurquoiseSunset
11-09-2011, 04:19 AM
In a lot of British TV comedy sexual innuendo is practically de rigueur, as is seen here in the series 'Allo 'Allo, that ran for quite a while some years ago.

I loved 'Allo 'Allo. It was so ridiculous. I will never forget, "Leesten very closely, for I will say zis only vonce..." :D I also liked Keeping Up Appearances, Faulty Towers and Black Adder...and Brittas Empire come to think of it, but only because of Brittas. And there was this one cartoon about two podiatrists that I really liked as well.

Anyway, as for American comedy I currently like Mordern Family. I think it's brilliant. I also like BB Theory, but not as much as MF.

Hm, this has gone a bit off topic...

Edit: Back to Frasier. My favourite character was Niles. He just made the show for me.

Emil Miller
11-09-2011, 11:51 AM
I loved 'Allo 'Allo. It was so ridiculous. I will never forget, "Leesten very closely, for I will say zis only vonce..." :D I also liked Keeping Up Appearances, Faulty Towers and Black Adder...and Brittas Empire come to think of it, but only because of Brittas. And there was this one cartoon about two podiatrists that I really liked as well.

Anyway, as for American comedy I currently like Mordern Family. I think it's brilliant. I also like BB Theory, but not as much as MF.

Hm, this has gone a bit off topic...

Edit: Back to Frasier. My favourite character was Niles. He just made the show for me.

Like much of British TV comedy 'Allo 'Allo was ridiculous but that's what made it funny. It's the TV equivalent of English seaside postcards, full of double entendres and vulgarity. It appeared on the London stage for a season and did very good business. A colleague of mine went to see it and said that there was a party of French people sitting behind him and they didn't laugh once throughout the entire performance.
Keeping up Appearances was also very funny. Unlike 'Allo 'Allo, the characters were closer to reality than caricatures: especially Onslow of whom there are many such individuals in the UK.

Mutatis-Mutandis
11-09-2011, 05:40 PM
I think you're right about that. But it was a remote war for you.

Even WWII was not as central, metaphorically and actually, to the US - which was recognised even at the time. The handbook for GIs coming to Britain said, "Back home you were in a country at war. Here in Britain you are in a war zone."

My American wife was astonished when she went to the Imperial War Museum and saw pictures of London during the Blitz. As she said, "Jesus, it was 9/11 every night."


The first world war had a much bigger impact outside of the USA. For many countries it was like an entire generation of boys had been wiped out. In Canada, 1% of the population at large was killed in the war, with casualty levels comparable to the US's during the war, despite a much smaller population. The countries on the continent suffered even heavier losses.

Oh, we definitely don't have the personal connection that Europe has to these wars. Our only real connection is the soldiers that went over there, and they came in late, and they weren't fighting for their own home. I think, for Americans, the idea of our homeland being attacked on a large scale is completely novel. The idea itself is completely ludicrous, meant only for popular video games.

TurquoiseSunset
11-10-2011, 06:57 AM
Like much of British TV comedy 'Allo 'Allo was ridiculous but that's what made it funny. It's the TV equivalent of English seaside postcards, full of double entendres and vulgarity. It appeared on the London stage for a season and did very good business. A colleague of mine went to see it and said that there was a party of French people sitting behind him and they didn't laugh once throughout the entire performance.
Keeping up Appearances was also very funny. Unlike 'Allo 'Allo, the characters were closer to reality than caricatures: especially Onslow of whom there are many such individuals in the UK.

Yes, the ridiculousness makes the show...without it the show would have been boring and forgetable.

And it's true what you say about Keeping up With Appearances too.

CarpeNixta
12-04-2011, 12:29 AM
I don't remember much of Cheers (was too young then), but I love Frasier.
I also loved Seinfield, recently I watch The Big Bang Theory and Modern Family