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Scheherazade
08-04-2010, 06:54 AM
After reading an article on BBC Magazine, I wondered which movies made you cry.

"The Champ" did get to me when I first watched it.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-10814813

MarkBastable
08-04-2010, 07:19 AM
After reading an article on BBC Magazine, I wondered which movies made you cry.

"The Champ" did get to me when I first watched it.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-10814813


I unfailingly blub like a small child during the last scene of The Railway Children. Then again - it doesn't take much. I used to shed a not-unmanly tear at the Yellow Pages ad where the dad gets his son a second-hand bike.

"I wor reet about that saddle though.."

papayahed
08-04-2010, 07:30 AM
I unfailingly blub like a small child during the last scene of The Railway Children. Then again - it doesn't take much. I used to shed a not-unmanly tear at the Yellow Pages ad where the dad gets his son a second-hand bike.

"I wor reet about that saddle though.."

Those damn phone companies. There was a commercial here about an old guy and his grandson walking on Normandy beach and the old guys was like "We didn't think you'd care what we did here". Old people with young kids always gets me.

The most embarrasing movie I shed a tear during was Born in East LA.:blush:

Lokasenna
08-04-2010, 07:51 AM
They're damn right about Life is Beautiful - has me in floods of tears every time.

dafydd manton
08-04-2010, 09:50 AM
It's bad enough I have to admit to Bambi, when I was a lot younger, but there are even moments in Chicken Run. I totally agree with Mark about The Railway Children. Ever watched Goodnight, Mister Tom? I gets me so badly, I have to leave the room. I've never actually seen it right the way through. I seem to get worse as I get older.

Emil Miller
08-04-2010, 09:51 AM
Film makers know how to tug the heartstrings and there are numerous examples of films to prove it. I often know when they are trying and usually remain unmoved by the manipulation, but there are two films that I find hard to watch because they are so brilliantly done. Both made in 1945 while the war was still in progress, they are beautifully understated pictures of the, then, British character. Brief Encounter is probably the finest film ever made in Britain and certainly among the most moving.
The Way to the Stars, about the lives of WWII bomber crews and the people living in the nearby village is also very poignant. The scene where John Mills has to tell Rosamund John that her husband, Michael Redgrave, has be killed in a raid on Germany is pretty devastating.

dafydd manton
08-04-2010, 09:56 AM
Notice all the males are Brits? The times they are a-changing - and so much the better, too. Goodbye, stiff upper lippery!

Emil Miller
08-04-2010, 10:10 AM
Notice all the males are Brits? The times they are a-changing - and so much the better, too. Goodbye, stiff upper lippery!

Well, as a matter of fact, they are not all Brits in The Way to the Stars, because half way through the film, the Americans arrive on the airfield to do the daytime bombing and Robert Montgomery and Bonar Colleano play major roles in the film. There is a very sad ending when Robert Montgomery, returning from a raid with very little fuel left and a bomb stuck in the bomb bay, tries to land his damaged aircraft so that it doesn't fall on the village and is killed when it explodes on the runway. It wasn't only the British who had to keep stiff upper lips during the war.

MarkBastable
08-04-2010, 10:18 AM
Well, as a matter of fact, they are not all Brits in The Way to the Stars....

He means that the respondents to this thread are all Brits - the implication being that we're not all as tightly-buttoned as the Trevor Howard archetype of a Brit would suggest.

I take your point about the effectiveness of The Way to the Stars, but I don't think it has aged well. It might be true to its era and the attitudes and actions of the people who went through that war in that job, but it has been so accurately and repeatedly parodied since then that it's very difficult to see past the style in order to appreciate the content. Through no fault of its own, it quite often teeters on the brink of laughable.

Emil Miller
08-04-2010, 10:52 AM
He means that the respondents to this thread are all Brits - the implication being that we're not all as tightly-buttoned as the Trevor Howard archetype of a Brit would suggest.

I take your point about the effectiveness of The Way to the Stars, but I don't think it has aged well. It might be true to its era and the attitudes and actions of the people who went through that war in that job, but it has been so accurately and repeatedly parodied since then that it's very difficult to see past the style in order to appreciate the content. Through no fault of its own, it quite often teeters on the brink of laughable.

Yes I saw the Peter Cook and Dudley Moore sketch, which was very funny. However, I subsequently saw the film at the Barbican film theatre and I can assure you that none of the audience were laughing.

MarkBastable
08-04-2010, 06:05 PM
Yes I saw the Peter Cook and Dudley Moore sketch, which was very funny. However, I subsequently saw the film at the Barbican film theatre and I can assure you that none of the audience were laughing.

I'm not sure I've ever heard anyone laugh at the Barbican. I think there's a bye-law against it.

Emil Miller
08-04-2010, 06:27 PM
I'm not sure I've ever heard anyone laugh at the Barbican. I think there's a bye-law against it.

Nope, when I saw the Jessie Mathews film 'First a Girl' there, there was plenty of laughter.

Gilliatt Gurgle
08-04-2010, 08:50 PM
“Saving Private Ryan”
There was a slow but steady tide welling up throughout the movie and I nearly kept it in check until I saw an elderly man behind me sobbing with his wife, as we were getting up to leave the theater. I could only surmise that he had to be a veteran and who knows, he may have taken part in D-Day. His wife helped him walk out. That scene caused the flood gates to open.

“Schindlers List”

And the all American tear jerker; “Old Yeller”:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/e/e3/OYVHS.jpg/187px-OYVHS.jpg

DanielBenoit
08-04-2010, 09:34 PM
Schindler's List of course.

2001: A Space Odyssey: The sheer beauty of the space ballet scene and the discovery of the tool scene are among the most objectively moving moments in all of cinema.

That one reaction shot of Bogart when he sees Bergman after all those years in Casablanca breaks my heart every time.

One of the most unconventional tear-jerkers was Lynch's devastating short film The Grandmother.

The singing in the snow scene from Kurosawa's Ikiru is one of the most humble and beautiful hymns to life ever put on film.

The deathbed scene from Kubrick's Barry Lyndon is profoundly sad, in a film which otherwise dryly laughs in the face of sentimentality.

Of all of this I must say that the greatest cry I've had at the movies was my first viewing of Dreyer's silent masterpiece, The Passion of Joan of Arc. Renée Jeanne Falconetti's performance was and still is the most uncanniest and greatest performance in all of cinema. A silent and subtle tear comes out of my eye during that infinite moment when Joan recollects who taut her the Lord's prayer.

Shoah, the nine hour Holocaust documentary put me into such utter devastation that its celluoid abyss had me beyond tears. The same goes for Bergman's Cries and Whispers, Klimov's Come and See and Haneke's The Seventh Continent. These four films together are the most devastating and depressing I have ever seen.

Two of Ozu's masterpieces Late Spring and Tokyo Story are so subtly moving and understated that when you cry, you know you're not crying out of movie sentimentality but out of real human emotions. Ozu's most moving scenes, like all proper tear-inducing scenes, make you cry just a little and just enough to make you feel close enough the life of his own characters.

The ending of One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest for sure. That shot of the sink crashing through the window is one of the greatest cries for human freedom and dignity as ever I have seen on film. It is a crashing through the authoritative consciousness of Nurse Ratchett.

That said, I have had plenty of equally moving experiences at the movies and have not cried. Renoir's two masterpieces, The Grand Illusion and The Rules of the Game have deeply moving moments of sublimity. As do Bergman's and Fellini's films.

I must also note that almost none of the aforementioned films are in any way conventional Titanic-esque tearjerkers. Ozu is almost the complete antithesis of Hollywood pathos, despite generally making family semi-melodramas, while Kubrick pretty much laughs all of the sentimentality out of his characters in his God-like detachment.

I must note my elitist disgust at LOTR being number one tear-jerker. Or maybe that's just my own shame of memories of being a nine year old and seeing the third film over a dozen times and weeping at the end of each one. Jesus, as a kid, I cried simply from hearing the opening score of Titanic. God was I sentimental.

Also; The Italian Job? "Made some critics cry." That raised quite an eyebrow.

This all leads to a very important and pending question: Do I cry too much for a partially straight man? :sosp:

OrphanPip
08-04-2010, 10:50 PM
This all leads to a very important and pending question: Do I cry too much for a partially straight man? :sosp:

Psssh, gender role conformity is way overrated anyway.

As to the thread topic, I'm not a big crying type of person when it comes to movies. Some documentaries have gotten to me a few times.

JuniperWoolf
08-05-2010, 02:51 AM
I couldn't stop crying during the last part of Requiem for a Dream. Jesum crow, that was depressing.

Other than that, I can't think of anything. I cried a little during Donnie Darko, but I'm pretty sure that was just from hearing Mad World for the first time.

Schindler's List never made me cry. To tell you the truth, I found it kind of uplifting after all of the disturbing halocaust information that I've waded through in my short lifetime. "Hey look! He saved them! Well... that's real nice."

DanielBenoit
08-05-2010, 11:20 AM
Schindler's List never made me cry. To tell you the truth, I found it kind of uplifting after all of the disturbing halocaust information that I've waded through in my short lifetime. "Hey look! He saved them! Well... that's real nice."

Speilberg, known for his habitual optimism in his films ironically is able to pull off the sentiment best in his darkest film. As a matter of fact, that ending is the most tear-inducing scene of the whole film. I agree with you that it is uplifting, far more uplifting than Shoah, which despite being more profound offers no hope (this is in no way a criticism of the film, which is indeed an even more moving and powerful film than Speilberg's.)

Basil
08-06-2010, 12:26 AM
Damned rabbits.

http://i457.photobucket.com/albums/qq298/Mr-Sack/WD.jpg

I watched Watership Down shortly after my dog died of leukemia. It wasn't a pretty sight.

Scheherazade
08-06-2010, 08:57 AM
I am refusing to watch "Watership Down" even though I got the movie at home.

To be perfectly honest, I started to watch it a few times but as soon as the going gets tough, this "tough" gets going so I turned it off quickly every single time.

I think something might have gotten into my eye at the end of "Pan's Labyrinth" as well and I might have turned a little watery-eyed then too.

"Angela's Ashes"... I read the book without much problem but the movie... I think it is all Emily Watson's doing.

Lokasenna
08-06-2010, 09:04 AM
I think something might have gotten into my eye at the end of "Pan's Labyrinth" as well and I might have turned a little watery-eyed then too.


Yes, I was in much the same position, blubbering away quietly in the corner and trying not to look like I was.

MarkBastable
08-06-2010, 09:17 AM
Nah - no such reaction to Watership Down. I mean, they're rabbits. Rabbits.

This exchange from Friends pretty much sums up my feelings here...


Monica: "How about Bambi? You must have cried at Bambi."

Chandler: "It's an animated movie, for cryin' out loud."

Phoebe: "But when Bambi's mother dies..."

All (except Chandler): "Oh yeah. When his mother dies. God, yeah. Cried like a baby."

Monica(turning to Chandler): "Didn't you cry when Bambi's mother died?"

Chandler: "You mean, did I cry when the man stopped drawing her?"


Disney never makes me cry. Or laugh. The early stuff is emetically mawkish and the later stuff - when they tried to put in gags for adults - is nauseatingly knowing. Though there's a lot to learn from the plot structure of Cinderella, given that so little happens.

Scheherazade
08-06-2010, 09:42 AM
I mean, they're rabbits. Rabbits. I think you should get some pet rabbits.

1. "Watership Down" is not a Disney movie, thoough. It is all British.

Guess you did not read the book either.

2.
This exchange from Friends pretty much sums up my feelings here...You watch(ed) "Friends"????

:svengo:

MarkBastable
08-06-2010, 09:53 AM
I think you should get some pet rabbits.

1. "Watership Down" is not a Disney movie, thoough. It is all British.

Guess you did not read the book either.


I know. When I cited Disney I was talking about Bambi. I should have made that clear.

I did read Watership Down. When I was twelve. It's quite good when you're twelve. It's like Beatrix Potter with death in it.




2. You watch(ed) "Friends"????



Yeah. It was really tightly-written in a way that pretty much defined American sitcoms for two decades. And when it was funny, it was very funny indeed. They strung it out too long, I think - but the quality of the writing was sustained at a high level throughout.

Scheherazade
08-06-2010, 10:11 AM
I did read Watership Down. When I was twelve. It was written then?

I read it only a few years ago (after I joined this Forum)... I was not 12 at the time, of course.



I watched "Love Story" when I was a little girl and blubbered till I could no more. Don't know why my parents let me watch it really.

DanielBenoit
08-06-2010, 04:19 PM
I've been meaning to see Watership Down but I still have not.

Grave of Fireflies is immensely moving and in fact along with Miyazaki's works, got me into anime. That film is a true telling as to what anime can do at its greatest. Ebert even called it "one of the greatest anti-war films ever made".


I am refusing to watch "Watership Down" even though I got the movie at home.

To be perfectly honest, I started to watch it a few times but as soon as the going gets tough, this "tough" gets going so I turned it off quickly every single time.

One of the only films that truly gives me that reaction is Broken Blossoms from 1919. It's the only D.W. Griffith film that I find bearable all the way through. It's kind of ironic that after making the most racist film of all time (The Birth of a Nation) Griffith suddenly makes four years later the first film with an interracial romance. It was probably some kind of redemption, either critically or personally. And even though the romance is extremely tame by today's standards, and the actor was wearing yellowface (he was playing a Chinese immigrant) it was still shockingly revolutionary, especially considering that it was made forty-nine years before Guess Who's Coming to Dinner?

Now the film itself, despite being as squeaky-sentimental as Griffith gets, it truly broke my heart seeing Lillian Gish for the first time. Just devastating. And then that closet scene (which must have influenced The Shining) is really too painful to watch, even 91 years later.

I've only watched it once and I just can't bear to watch it again. It's online here:

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-1214415598017583235#

Here's The Passion of Joan of Arc as well, which is in my opinion a far more profound and well-made film, but no less soul-shattering.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BLBn9KK2Ss0&feature=related

dafydd manton
08-06-2010, 04:25 PM
:nono:
I think you should get some pet rabbits.

1. "Watership Down" is not a Disney movie, thoough. It is all British.

Guess you did not read the book either.

2. You watch(ed) "Friends"????

Ah, rabbit. Very nice, a few peas, bit of onion gravy. Or jugged. :nono:

As for Love Story, I saw that in about 1972 (I know, I know), and I thought it was the most mawkish, vomit-inducing load of rubbish I had ever seen. Not much has changed that point of view. (We got thrown out when a close friend shouted something VERY rude at the seminal moment where she snuffs it!) :yikes::yikes:

Lokasenna
08-06-2010, 04:32 PM
Grave of Fireflies is immensely moving and in fact along with Miyazaki's works, got me into anime. That film is a true telling as to what anime can do at its greatest. Ebert even called it "one of the greatest anti-war films ever made".


I thought it was bloody awful, to be honest. I thought it laboured and entirely forgetful, and I'm usually a sucker for sentimentality.

Lulim
08-06-2010, 04:38 PM
La Strada makes me always cry.

Basil
08-06-2010, 04:43 PM
It was only a matter of time before this thread turned into "Rate That Emotional Response to a Movie."

Jim Sheridan's In America is a good movie that somehow doesn't become greater than its parts, but I wholly recommend it on the basis of the Bolger sisters' amazing performances and the ending, which is just an emotional gut-punch.

DanielBenoit
08-06-2010, 04:47 PM
I almost forgot to mention Lars von Trier's films, which less inspire tears but rather total emotional devastation. With Breaking the Waves, Dogville and Antichrist on his list, I don't think any director ever has more consistently caused his audiences more pain and emotional turmoil.


I thought it was bloody awful, to be honest. I thought it laboured and entirely forgetful, and I'm usually a sucker for sentimentality.

:svengo: To each his own I suppose.


La Strada makes me always cry.

Idk why but I found Night of Carabia to be more moving. Either way, Giulietta Masina is just adorable and deserves the title "the female Chaplin."

OrphanPip
08-06-2010, 04:54 PM
I thought it was bloody awful, to be honest. I thought it laboured and entirely forgetful, and I'm usually a sucker for sentimentality.

*Spoiler* It's largely autobiographical, the author dedicated it to his sister, who he couldn't save from starvation during the war. I think it's kind of interesting that in Grave of the Fireflies, the boy dies as well. *Spoiler*

In general, it has plodding moments, and it's Ghibli's lowest budget movie, but there's something about it that makes it one of the greatest animated films in history. Barefoot Gen, I think, is a more interesting WWII animated film, this one actually drawn (in comic form) and directed by a Hiroshima survivor, and his art, drawn from memory, is some of the only images of the after-math, because the US government prevented video or photographic evidence.

Also, on the subject of Watership Down, Hubley (A former Disney animator, and groundbreaking animator of UPA) directed the opening prologue, done in that Primitivist style. So, there's a mild Disney connection there.

Edit: Although, I think I sometimes appreciate Rosen's adaptation of Watership Down more for it's wonderful use of watercolor backgrounds and it's painstaking dedication to a realistic production. He also directed an adaptation of Adams' much more didactic animal rights novel, Plague Dogs, which was even darker than WD.

Emil Miller
08-06-2010, 06:20 PM
Idk why but I found Night of Carabia to be more moving. Either way, Giulietta Masina is just adorable and deserves the title "the female Chaplin."

La Strada and Nights of Cabiria are both incredibly moving, but it's because Fellini's masterly direction endows each story with a sympathetic understanding of the human relationships in each film. Giulietta Massina must be rated one of the greatest cinematic actresses of all time.

Helga
08-08-2010, 07:16 AM
I always cry at movies! but Old Yeller gets me every time! also when I first saw finding nemo, oh man I was with my friend babysitting and she went outside to smoke and when she came back inside I was crying with the baby in my arms over the death of the mom and all 399 siblings Nemo had.

Maximilianus
09-07-2010, 12:23 AM
“Saving Private Ryan”
There was a slow but steady tide welling up throughout the movie and I nearly kept it in check until I saw an elderly man behind me sobbing with his wife, as we were getting up to leave the theater. I could only surmise that he had to be a veteran and who knows, he may have taken part in D-Day. His wife helped him walk out. That scene caused the flood gates to open.
I lived a similar experience, especially when I saw the movie for the first time, but even now that final scene at the cemetery has the ability to hit me bad. Also the final scenes from Titanic, especially when DiCaprio frozenly sinks down like lead into the sea after asking Lady Winslet to live on :bawling: Another scene that kills me is the death of Boromir, at the end of The Fellowship of the Ring... a character who certainly knew how to die a touching death :bawling: And my memory demands that I mention Forrest Gump, a movie that for some reason hits me from prologue to epilogue, in a more or less constant river of sorrow http://smiles.kolobok.us/standart/cray2.gif

This thread has reminded me how much I wasn't born for laughter. Grief is my league http://smiles.kolobok.us/standart/yes2.gif

And to add yet another bitter flavor, I'm listening to Trail of Tears, by W.A.S.P. ... I can't escape my karma :nonod:

The Comedian
12-16-2010, 11:59 AM
Alright. . .I'm not much of a cry-er (for anything) but there are three movies that brought me to a tear or two. . .

1. Old Yeller -- Thanks Gillatte for reminding me of that.
2. Field of Dreams. . . . when Costner asks his dad if he wants to "have a catch". . .
3. Off the Map. . . .when Sam Elliott's character says to his daughter. "you bought me a boat for my birthday". . .

Emil Miller
12-18-2010, 05:05 PM
La Strada has been mentioned a number of times on this thread so here are the opening titles and some scenes from the film which is not only very moving but among the greatest films ever made.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cWyZk8s2oyg

Silas Thorne
12-18-2010, 05:40 PM
'Cyrano de Bergerac' with Gerard dePardieu, at the end.
Many other movies that I can't think of right now.

I also cry every time I read Oscar Wilde's 'The Selfish Giant' aloud, so I try not to.

Taliesin
12-19-2010, 08:17 AM
Well, this might be me being a stereotypical "hot-blooded Estonian lad", but I can't remember a single happenstance of me crying while watching a movie.

Maybe sometimes in the childhood, but I can't remember any specific movie. And before you ask, no, I don't think I ever saw Bambi. Nor Watership Down.

So, maybe this is just the case of me being ignorant about movies.

Maryd.
12-19-2010, 08:37 AM
'Cyrano de Bergerac' with Gerard dePardieu, at the end...

I loved this movie and cried too... Mind you I have a thing for Gerard Depardieu. I know he's no Rock Hudson... But he's cute to me... Sympatico, if you will! Hahaha.

I also cried at the end of the movie "The Champ" How about that. Your's truly can cry.... Hahaha.

papayahed
12-19-2010, 09:26 AM
Steel Magnolias
The Color Purple
Born in East LA

Emil Miller
01-22-2011, 04:44 PM
The Wild Bunch is spoiled by the director's inability to avoid the over the top blood and thunder element that is obviously designed to appeal to the teenage element of the audience.The film is nevertheless interesting because it shows how progress overtakes a group of outlaws who refuse to conform to a new era. In this scene, the gang are riding out of a Mexican village where they have stayed and are going to what they and the villagers know will be their last fight with authority. It is an excellently directed scene and also one of the most moving in the whole of the western genre.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GjqkHULSOtw