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View Full Version : What about Turgenev?



Rores28
07-26-2010, 06:29 PM
How does he compare to the other Russian big boys and what stories would you recommend?

dfloyd
07-26-2010, 07:31 PM
but others have a different opinion. Read his two short novels The Torrents of Spring and Fathers and Sons, then form your own opinion. He also wrote some short stories.

Dark Muse
07-26-2010, 09:19 PM
I am still realtively new to Russian litature so I do not have a lot in which I can use to compare and judge, but I can say that I abolsutely loved Fathers and Sons and thought it was a fabulous book.

mal4mac
07-27-2010, 06:50 AM
I didn't like Fathers and Sons as much as the works of Chekhov, Tolstoy, or Dostoevsky. But it's a quick & easy read, and worth investigating. The main character Bazarov is often p9nted to as the standard portrait of a nihilist. But his nihilistic negation of the spiritual realm of life gets little consideration in the novel. So its very low key compared to the spiritual struggles that Dostevsky's characters go through, and the novel has nothing like the scale and variety shown in Tolstoy's novels. The characters are rather bland compared to Chekhov's.

Tallon
07-27-2010, 09:39 AM
I love Fathers and Sons, i rate it up there with the best Russian novels i have read.

Zach J.
07-29-2010, 01:32 AM
I really liked Fathers and Sons and The Torrents of Spring, but I haven't read any Dostoevsky and very little Tolstoy so I can't really say how Turgenev compares to them.

mal4mac
07-29-2010, 07:21 AM
I really liked Fathers and Sons and The Torrents of Spring, but I haven't read any Dostoevsky and very little Tolstoy so I can't really say how Turgenev compares to them.

Try Tolstoy "The Cossacks" and Dostoevsky "Notes from the Underground" - Two short novels with a similar, perplexed young hero. For Chekhov try "Ward No. 6 and Other Stories". Turgenev isn't bad, but these works are as good as it gets.

_Shannon_
07-29-2010, 08:37 AM
I liked Fathers and Sons, which is the only Turgenev I've read. I thought of it as Russians-lite. It reminded me a bit of Austen, but I didn't loathe all of the characters the way I do in all of her books.

One Gallant
07-29-2010, 08:41 AM
First thing I read by Turgenev was First Love (which is only about 100 pages). I'd recommend that as a good place to start.

Rores28
08-11-2010, 10:19 PM
Anything to say about different translations? Is there a pevear and volonofsky or a facsimile for Turgenev?

Boris239
08-12-2010, 07:57 PM
It's difficult to compare Turgenev and Dostoevskiy. They are too different, they also look at Russia from different points of view- while Turgenev is definitely a Westerner ("Zapadnik"), Dostoevsky is a Slavyanofil. I've read a lot by Dostoevsky and "Fathers and Sons" and "Rudin" from Turgenev novels. Even though philosophically Turgenev is much easier understandable, I haven't felt the same deepeness, even though Feodor Mikhailovich is a nationalistic antisemitic crazy man.... The modern comparison I've read in Tsypkin's "Summer in Baden Baden" (highly reccomended book about Dostoevsky) is the difference in views between Sakharov and Solzhenitsyn.

Zach J.
08-15-2010, 06:50 PM
Try Tolstoy "The Cossacks" and Dostoevsky "Notes from the Underground" - Two short novels with a similar, perplexed young hero. For Chekhov try "Ward No. 6 and Other Stories". Turgenev isn't bad, but these works are as good as it gets.

I actually have copies of "Notes from the Underground" and "Ward No. 6 and Other Stories" laying on my shelf waiting to be read.