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skorpionqn
05-07-2005, 02:46 AM
Zarathustra is a very engrossing work. I haven't finished reading it :blush:, but I was just curious as to the thoughts of those who have.

I guess the work is especially relevant now, with lax morals and ethics in society. On the subject, do you believe in the existence of absolute morals, or subjective values that evolve over time and change with circumstantial consideration?

mono
05-08-2005, 01:29 AM
Greetings, skorpionqn, welcome to the forum.
I read Friedrich Nietzsche's Thus Spake Zarathustra a few years ago and loved it, though I still remain a skeptic on some concepts that Nietzsche explored.
In terms of morals, I find myself more of the deontological (Immanuel Kant) thinker-and-doer, so to speak, believing more in the subjective perception of right and wrong, and not so much an absolute. Utilitarianism (John Stuart Mill and Jeremy Bentham) works somewhat in the same way, seeking the 'greatest good,' but not so much aimed with intention, as with deontological ethics.
Nietzsche, unlike many philosophers, looked much into the psychological and sociological influences on morals and ethics, and how a culture, place of birth, and nurture can vastly affect one's concepts of 'right' and 'wrong;' but, considering his era, I find this not surprising with the amount of breakthrough research occurring in the social sciences.

Prufrock
05-17-2005, 10:46 PM
Nietzsche wanted this to replace what today we use as The Bible. Jorge Luis Borges, argentinean writer refutes this wish that bornes in Nietzsche, since his arguments are plageurized. I.E., when Nietzsche says that time repeats itself, Pythagoreas and many others said that 300 B.C.

Nietzsche defenders hide behind the argument of: "It's because of Nietzsche's ignorance of such theories".

I personally wasn't impressed by the book, and his view on women is atrocious, though we know that it's something personal.

lydiev
06-21-2005, 03:30 AM
Nietzsche wanted this to replace what today we use as The Bible. Jorge Luis Borges, argentinean writer refutes this wish that bornes in Nietzsche, since his arguments are plageurized. I.E., when Nietzsche says that time repeats itself, Pythagoreas and many others said that 300 B.C.

Nietzsche defenders hide behind the argument of: "It's because of Nietzsche's ignorance of such theories".

I personally wasn't impressed by the book, and his view on women is atrocious, though we know that it's something personal.
You may not have realised yet that, in fact, any philosophical theory is just a reaction to the previous ones (possitive or negative). That is what's called developement.
Moreover, most of his books were censored (rewrote) by his own sister so it is really quite useless to discuss how wonderfully or badly he wrote it.

starrwriter
10-24-2005, 10:27 PM
"Zarathustra" is one of the great epics of western literature. Aside from the beauty of the language, the message is more positive than most of Nietzsche's writings.

As to Nietzsche questioning morality, that was the result of his training as a philologist -- the field we call linguistics today. He studied the origin of key cultural words to learn how their meaning had evolved over time.

For instance, good originally meant of noble birth and bad meant vulgar or common. Bad eventually become evil, but with a new meaning from Christianity. Pride, power, wealth and other attributes of the original "good" became evil.

Nietzsche was one of the first philosophers to take an anthropological view of cultural values. He tried to establish the cultural context in which they appeared -- a much more scientific (objective) approach than most other philosophers.

ponynikki
10-26-2005, 08:21 PM
"Thus Spoke Zarathustra" is my favorite book of all time. When you finish it you should read "Sanin" by Mikhail Artsybashev, if you haven't already. Though I do not hold everything Nietzsche wrote as gospel, his works never ceased to amaze me...

starrwriter
10-26-2005, 10:29 PM
"Thus Spoke Zarathustra" is my favorite book of all time. When you finish it you should read "Sanin" by Mikhail Artsybashev, if you haven't already. Though I do not hold everything Nietzsche wrote as gospel, his works never ceased to amaze me...
The gospel according to Nietzsche? I think he just rolled over in his grave laughing.

I first read Nietzsche at age 15. I was too young to fully understand what he said, but I was dazzled by his writing style (especially after reading the boring styles of other philosophers.)

Never heard of Artsybashev, but I'll see if I can find "Sanin" in my local public library.