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inquisitor
09-29-2008, 06:03 PM
Does Frankenstein have the sense of smell and taste?

inquisitor
09-30-2008, 09:51 AM
does anybody know?

mosimo
09-30-2008, 10:39 AM
I thought he did but in doing a word search of the book I was unable to find reference that he did. I don't know where I got the idea that he did have smell. Yet going over the creation in chapter 5 there were no references to smell so he might not have smell. Taking into consideration he was working day and night with dead flesh not being able to smell would explain why he can do it.

LilyPan
10-25-2008, 09:30 PM
it could go both ways. in reality of the story an abnormal brain was put into his head which just made him not function as normal as others which is why he couldn't talk properly. The lack of taste and smell is hard to say because he easily could have those senses but also couldn't as part of having an abnormal brain. It's really a tie between the thought.

RG57
11-09-2008, 08:19 PM
If this were real, the problem would be making all the nerves and and sensory factors work. With all that caring and sewing, it's unlikely that his sense of smell or taste worked at all.

bibliophile190
11-09-2008, 08:33 PM
Well, are we talking about Dr. Frankenstein or Frankenstein's monster?

Quilp
11-09-2008, 10:56 PM
When I read your question I assumed you meant Victor Frankenstein.

If he didn't have a sense of smell I can only assume that it helped when handling those random bodyparts when assembling his creation.

As far as the monster goes - well, I can't remember any specific instance when it is mentioned.

Virgil
11-10-2008, 08:01 AM
Does Frankenstein have the sense of smell and taste?

I don't know, but I'm sure he's got body odor. :p Why do you ask?

Amylian
01-08-2009, 12:28 PM
If you mean the monster, although I hate referring to him as such, I do not remember that there was any reference in the book as I finished reading it last week.

Janine
01-08-2009, 01:15 PM
Does Frankenstein have the sense of smell and taste?

Inquisitor, I would say the answer to your question is 'Yes' if you are speaking of the creature. As everyone has stated 'Frankenstein' is the creator and not the creature. Have you read the novel? You can't go by the old films because they don't follow closely to the novel at all.

There are references in the novel indicating he can indeed smell and taste foods. I will try and look them up for you. I read this book twice and I also listened recently to the audiofile being read. I know that, when he was in the woods, he ate berries and he remarked that he tried to put them over a fire and cook them, but they did not taste good. This was the period when he came upon the family living in the woodland area. He saw them using fire to cook. He also remarked about smelling their food, I do believe. I will have come back with references.

Quote by RG57

If this were real, the problem would be making all the nerves and and sensory factors work. With all that caring and sewing, it's unlikely that his sense of smell or taste worked at all.

RG57, the novel is indeed totally unrealistic; it was not meant to be realistic. There are references to the fact the creature could smell and eat/taste. I guess Victor was did some indricate sewing on his creation. :lol: If you looked at the novel realistically, it would be totally absurd and impossible; for instance, the body parts could not last or be vital and usable, like they do, without being frozen or preserved in some form. Considering the book took place during the 19th Century, this would be totally unfeasable; they didn't have transplant knowledge then, like they do now.

This novel is a horror genre bascially, with a deeper meaning about mankind and creation.

quote by LilyPan :

it could go both ways. in reality of the story an abnormal brain was put into his head which just made him not function as normal as others which is why he couldn't talk properly. The lack of taste and smell is hard to say because he easily could have those senses but also couldn't as part of having an abnormal brain. It's really a tie between the thought.

Lily Pan, if you read the book, you must realise this assumption is false. The book does not make the monster a bumbling idiot. He was quite intelligent - probably more so than an normal man; one example it that he picked up language skills quickly. Later in the novel he has a totally coherent and intelligent conversation with his creator, Victor Frankenstein. The creation has been portrayed in other films as a monster or speechless idiot, and he is far from that in the orginal novel. Have you actually read the novel in it's entire text form?

Janine
01-08-2009, 01:22 PM
oops...sorry posted twice when editing by accident. Ignore this one.

Insane4Twain
06-16-2012, 03:21 AM
it could go both ways. in reality of the story an abnormal brain was put into his head which just made him not function as normal as others which is why he couldn't talk properly. I just finished reading it (again). Where do you get the notion an abnormal brain was put in his head?

By Frankenstein, I assume you're referring to the monster, not the creator.

jkolb
05-22-2016, 02:31 PM
Since Frankenstein's monster was able to describe to Victor his sensations of hunger and thirst, I think that this monster was able to smell his surroundings and taste food and drinks.