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View Full Version : Why Is Point Of View Important In Novels? esp Frankenstein?



Maljackson
11-04-2004, 01:53 PM
Hey guys

your help was great last time i posted and then my teacher asked me to ask myself this question?

Can anyone help me with this?

Why Is Point Of View Important In Novels?

She wants me to relate to Frakenstein

Scheherazade
11-04-2004, 02:12 PM
Do you think how you feel about things would have been different if you were a vampire or someone who is bitten by a vampire?

Shore Dude
11-04-2004, 02:15 PM
Is it fair to say... that over the course of a lifetime, each individual has a collection of experiences that are unique only to that person?

Maljackson
11-04-2004, 02:17 PM
Ok i know what you mean

but what are the effects of point of view.

for instance in frakenstein

Shore Dude
11-04-2004, 02:29 PM
First let me ask you this...

Did your mother ever get you a really smart and knowledgeable midget, who can act as your sidekick, by following you around wherever you go, while providing you information whenever you need it?

Maljackson
11-04-2004, 02:33 PM
ok sorry i was just asking for help.

sorry im really stuck.

im just trying to work out the effects of point of view in frakenstein

papayahed
11-04-2004, 02:38 PM
Do you think how you feel about things would have been different if you were a vampire or someone who is bitten by a vampire?


This answers your question.

Shore Dude
11-04-2004, 02:39 PM
Then do some thinking on your own. Don't just ask for answers. Instead, write out some replies to the questions above, and I am sure the people here would be more than happy to discuss both yours and their thoughts and insights.

Think about this question...

Remember when Dr. Frankenstein caught up with his monster in the mountains... And the monster told Victor stories about how he learned how to speak and live by watching the local villagers?

When listening to the monster tell his tale, the audience gets a different look into his personality, emotions, feelings, etc.? What characteristics did the monster have, that a reader had not gotten the chance to see up until this point in the novel?

papayahed
11-04-2004, 02:52 PM
Shore, Are you a teacher?

Maljackson
11-04-2004, 03:13 PM
As the monster speaks about his experiences we the reader find out more about him.

i started to sympathise with the monster because of the way he spoke to victor.

all he wanted was the simple things in life.

to feel. to touch. to be loved.to be happy.

we learn from his point of view.

Scheherazade
11-04-2004, 03:16 PM
So what kind of affect did it have on you? I.e., finding more about the monster?

Maljackson
11-04-2004, 03:18 PM
it made me feel emotional

i understand that the monsters point of view made me feel this but why is it important?

Shore Dude
11-04-2004, 03:25 PM
Well, think about the book/ novel without hearing the monster's side? Would it make the story more dull? Would it mislead readers, by not allowing them to understand the story in its entirety?

Also, by hearing the monster's side of the tale, by understanding that he does have feelings and emotions like a real person... when he gets enraged with the doctor later on in the story for not creating a mate for him, does it make his character more scary?

Did you look up how Frankenstein was written ...the setting/ circumstances in which Mary Shelly wrote the story?

Maljackson
11-04-2004, 03:29 PM
i found a little.

i know that shelly was pregnant when she wrote the book and that her husband had a big influence on her during the time of it being written.

what has the setting and circumstances got to do with the effects of the point of view in the novel?

hope that isnt a dumb question

Scheherazade
11-04-2004, 03:34 PM
If you hadn't found out about Monster's side of the story, how would you have reacted?
Did it make a difference in how much you like the book? -assuming you like it :p

Shore Dude
11-04-2004, 03:39 PM
what has the setting and circumstances got to do with the effects of the point of view in the novel?

In the summer of 1816, a young, well-educated woman from England traveled with her lover to the Swiss Alps. Unseasonable rain kept them trapped inside their lodgings, where they entertained themselves by reading ghost stories. At the urging of renowned poet Lord Byron, a friend and neighbor, they set their own pens to paper, competing to see who could write the best ghost story. The young woman, Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin, took the prize, having composed a story creepy enough not only to take its place alongside the old German tales that she and her Alpine companions had been reading, but also to become a bestseller in her time and a Gothic classic that still resonates with readers almost two centuries later.

Maljackson
11-04-2004, 03:45 PM
oh ok

lol

how old are u guys.

ur really helpful

Maljackson
11-04-2004, 03:47 PM
ok am i right in saying that waltons point of view helps set out the story.

the letters at the start help map out the begginings of victor.

the importance of waltons point of view is to direct the audience?

Shore Dude
11-04-2004, 03:48 PM
how old are u guys.
You should find this thread (http://www.online-literature.com/forums/showthread.php?t=3206&page=1&pp=15) quite helpful.

For any answer you seek, usually it is out there, you may just have to look.

(Man, that sounds like a fortune cookie.)

Shore Dude
11-04-2004, 03:51 PM
the importance of waltons point of view is to direct the audience?
Or if you think of it in terms of a novel, it helps to further along the plot.

Also, don't forget... now you know this was written to be a ghost story. By understanding the many different points of view -- the reader gets a deep look into the thoughts and emotions of the main characters. Doesn't that help make the story feel more real?

Since you can relate to the characters (and understand their feelings), doesn't it make the story more scary (when, for example, the monster is chasing Victor) or vice versa?

Maljackson
11-04-2004, 03:56 PM
ok.

why does shelly not allow us a insight into the female characters of the book?

say elizabeth.

i was wondering it might be because if she wanted a female point of view she would of made the monster a female companion but she didnt.

i agree with your points about it being scary

Shore Dude
11-04-2004, 04:04 PM
Not too sure about that question.

I have read that the role of women in Shelley's novel is characterized as passive -- some could say helpless. But the novel is suppossed to hint at the self-destructive nature of attempting to build, create, gain knowledge adn control nature. So think why Shelley might show women as passive in nature?

Don't forget the time in which Shelley is writing. The role of women in society. You can pretty much assure yourself that women writers were few and far between...

Maljackson
11-04-2004, 04:08 PM
so is it safe to say that the monsters point of view is the most effective in the novel?

Victors point of view is important but not as important as the monster

Scheherazade
11-04-2004, 04:09 PM
Still she herself being one, Shelley should have different views about role of women?

I am not sure about this one either...

Shore Dude
11-04-2004, 04:13 PM
so is it safe to say that the monsters point of view is the most effective in the novel?
Most effective at what?

Maljackson
11-04-2004, 04:15 PM
at driving the narrative

Scheherazade
11-04-2004, 04:17 PM
most effective in the sense that it affects the audience the most and it is the one which stands out most... I think :)

Shore Dude
11-04-2004, 04:18 PM
at driving the narrative
I don't think I would necessarily agree with that. But it's definitely debatable. Therein lies the beauty of studying literature. You're always right if you can support your views. Imagine that... always right.

Maljackson
11-04-2004, 04:20 PM
ok thanks guys.

thanks for your tips

got anymore?

lol

Scheherazade
11-04-2004, 04:21 PM
Nevermind us but how old are YOU, Mal? :)

Maljackson
11-04-2004, 04:22 PM
18

thats why i sound more un educated!

lol

thanks

Jay
11-06-2004, 02:07 PM
Actually thinking about stuffing Practical English voluntary homework to read Frankenstein only to be 'valid' to join this conversation. Ugh.
So not gonna talk about the novel but about POVs. I (have?) read Virginia Woolf's Mrs Dalloway for my lit class last week and found it a bit confusing because of the ever-changing POVs. I mean, it was all fine getting to know the characters and their feelings better but it was hard to keep track of who's 'talking'.
Getting the feeling this is so not what you were looking for, therefore am shutting up now.
Oh and Mal? The level of one's education's not really a matter of their age :)

Scheherazade
11-06-2004, 02:22 PM
Ugh! Don't remind me 'Mrs Dalloway'! Read it at university and I am not sure whether because it was a must or the book itself but could not enjoy it at all. I was ready to shed tears of joy by the time I finished it :'( The POVs did make it very difficult to follow the storyline.

Jay> You are so right about level education vs. age. :)

Jay
11-06-2004, 02:29 PM
It seems like Mrs Dalloway is a must in more universities then, lol. I wonder... ack, better not, already gone OT.
Btw ... oops, just noticed it's Scheherezade, sorry for misspelling that... on several occasions by now I'm sure.
OT: I see you're used to MSNM smilleys :D ;)

Scheherazade
11-06-2004, 05:42 PM
Btw ... oops, just noticed it's Scheherezade, sorry for misspelling that... on several occasions by now I'm sure.
OT: I see you're used to MSNM smilleys :D ;)

Dont worry about the spelling :) I spell it this way because Rimsky prefered it this way.

I am afraid I use my fair share of MSN which is why the smilies slip in :blush:

Jester
11-06-2004, 09:15 PM
whats OT?????

Jay
11-07-2004, 10:15 AM
Jes: OT means Off Topic
Scheherezade: (too long for my lazy fingers, so going to nickname that soon enough, lol); no probelmo there, guess why I recognized the smiley? Yeah, you guessed it, I'm on the messenger whenever I can ;)