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View Full Version : Should Jane Eyre be included in a high schools curriculum?



awink
10-17-2007, 09:47 PM
I need some help towards this question!

sciencefan
10-18-2007, 07:11 AM
I need some help towards this question!I believe Jane Eyre is a good bit of literature that is worthy enough of being taught in schools. I don't think it's "great" but then not everything the schools teach is great.

My only worry is the way the liberals twist it all around and use it as a way to slam Christianity and promote feminism.

Why do you ask?

traveling
10-30-2007, 11:01 PM
Why said this?

Dark Muse
11-05-2007, 04:02 AM
I rather enjoyed Jane Eyre and personally I think that though I do not beleive there is anything inaapropripate about the book which a person of higschool level could not understand and comprend, and I certaintly do not think it would corrupt the minds of the youth, I think the reader would get more out of the book reading it in the college level as I did, instead of in highschool. I do not know if I turly would have enjoyed it as much reading it in highschool as I did when I read it in college.

mousefeather
04-18-2008, 11:08 PM
I think Jane Eyre should be required for High School curriculum's. We were required to read it last year and I enjoyed it immensely! It's like Bronte put every emotion of the heart into words and wrote it down on paper. She's just... AWESOME! :D

What really made me upset though was my teacher's disinterest in the book. Sure, most of my classmates disliked the book. I was one of the few who actually enjoyed it. Of course, I read the entire thing over a 3-day weekend and was forced to endure the pain of my class's stupidity (honestly, there's no other word for it) for the next month and a half. It seemed like no one got it, the descriptions were too long, it was too confusing - the list went on and on and on. And my teacher AGREED!!!! Of course, this is a woman who consults a movie instead of a book, and thinks the movie version of "To Kill A Mockingbird" (with Gregory Peck) is overrated and cheesy.

But I just ignored her and reread it again and again. God, I probably read it about 16 times! But just recently another class was "forced" to read Jane Eyre. The teacher, the same woman, insisted upon rewriting it and editing out all of the long descriptions (example, or so relayed by a friend: Instead of going into the details of Jane's elfish nature, "Mr. Rochester called Jane an elf."). The woman destroyed the beauty of the book. It made me so MAD! :flare:

So yes, I definitely agree that Jane Eyre should be a required read for High School's, and I hope to god that every High School class that reads it has a competent, open minded teacher. We sure didn't, and still don't.

black butterffl
04-27-2008, 09:33 AM
I think Jane Eyre should be required for High School curriculum's. We were required to read it last year and I enjoyed it immensely! It's like Bronte put every emotion of the heart into words and wrote it down on paper. She's just... AWESOME! :D .
agree :D


"Mr. Rochester called Jane an elf."). The woman destroyed the beauty of the book. It made me so MAD! :flare: .
i thought it was kind of cute :P


So yes, I definitely agree that Jane Eyre should be a required read for High School's, and I hope to god that every High School class that reads it has a competent, open minded teacher. We sure didn't, and still don't.

hahah, i wish my school required us to read this book so can everyone see how awesome it is

kiki1982
08-11-2008, 06:15 PM
A little bit late maybe, but here oes:

I don't know if it should be included as compulsory literature... It is very deep and probably too deep for anyone who hasn't really read a lot yet... There are more books like that but on top of that Jane Eyre has an additional problem: it can (for the right person then) be profoundly boring.
I can imagine that it can bore you to death... Not that it bores me, on the contrary, I have been researching it for over a year now, but it totally doesn't appeal to my husband and he is 35... Then I dread to think what some teenagers think of it.
It also depends on the teacher... Some teachers are absloutely useless. Give them the most easy book there is and they're still useless at it. I was also a case like that: came up with topics even my teacher didn't consider and wouldn't uderstand...

A Victor Hugo or a Dumas is more universally appealing and also easier to inerpret than a Brontė. In Hugo there is a clear theme, in Dumas mostly as well and also a theme that can be discussed, but a Brontė is more profound and needs more careful interpretation than discussing what happened and discussing the (un)justness of Jane's condition. Maybe it would do better as a real project wth other works that can be related to it. Merely putting it on the list as compulsory literature wouldn't do it justice...

Equality72521
08-19-2008, 12:53 PM
Here's how important Jane Eyre was in our curriculum of a PAP class.

We read the book over the summer and I say "read" loosely because half of the people didn't read it, the smart people, and then we got to class, my teacher lectured one day on the Victorian era and then we took a test and wrote and essay. I made an A.

It doesn't involve as much detail as some of the other books and quite frankly, I don't think that it did much to our curriculum, it didn't hurt or help it. It's like one of those things that are just kind of there.

AshleyMare
12-09-2008, 02:54 PM
Of course it should be. Its beautifully written and a wonderful example of a classic. I guess you could say it also has some important lessons in it. Those could include, be yourself, beauty isn't everything, class doesn't matter and I'm sure if I thought about it I could find more. So, yes, they should definatley put it in schools.

Sg89
12-09-2008, 02:58 PM
To sciencefan -- what's wrong with "slamming Christianity and promoting feminism"?