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AuntShecky
10-03-2007, 12:43 PM
Here begins a thread for your poems about the writing of poetry. The first one is by your fly-by-night auntie.

Two Steps to a Healthier, Happier Poem

STEP ONE:
Take a word,
any word. Then-

drop it like a bad-news boyfriend
pound it like a fielder’s mitt
pet it like a neighbor’s mutt
stretchhhh it like a braggart’s truth
snap it like a hipster’s thumb
slap it like a jazzman’s bass
flatten it like a Minnesotan’s “a”
sharpen it like a fishwife’s tongue
twist it like a cheating couple’s sheet
tweak it like a toddler’s cheek

STEP TWO
Repeat.

Aunt Shecky
All rights reserved.

firefangled
10-03-2007, 01:36 PM
here's a short one I droped into the A Poem Is... thread, but I like it for here as well.

a poem is the needle
and the eye
a poem is the thread

and then the eye again

Niamh
10-03-2007, 03:53 PM
I've moved this to the new sub-forum which has been set up to home any threads for group activities etc.:)

symphony
10-04-2007, 04:47 AM
This is from the "A Poem Is..." thread too, I guess this will do for here as well.

Thinking the thoughts,
Voicing the voices,
Feeling the feelings—
Till the pen encounters a nervous bite.

And then there it is—
An image unforeseen
Designed with care,
Till a word becomes a world,
And a dot-
A thought.

The whiteness of the canvas
Reveals from within
All the colors there was in it
All the colors there ever will be…

And there’s no stopping it
Once the emotions are in motion.

The parchment shivers
As the quill jots down its
Imperfect efforts.

A feeling has been felt,
A voice has been voiced,
A thought has found a face—
A poem has been penned down.

20 July '07.

AuntShecky
10-04-2007, 11:21 AM
13 Ways Of Looking At Wallace Stevens

I
Five bucks says
you don't get ‘im
the first time.

II
There was a jockey
with the same last name.
Every time I bet on him
he lost, and every time
I bet against him,
he won.

III
You know, there are several
different kinds of blackbirds.
One species has a broad red
racing stripe on each wing.
The others don't.

IV
I really dread doing it,
but I guess I'd better
start looking into getting
some kind of insurance.

V
What’s the big deal with
the glass of water and that jar
in Tennessee? I thought
down south they were
big on bourbon.

VI
Things as they are
are never quite as good
as we want ‘em to be
and never quite as bad
as we think.

VII
You don't see many women
wearing peignoirs these days.
Then again, you can find
a load of complacency
in a pair of sweatpants.

VIII
What kind of ice-cream
would you order if you were
an emperor?

IX
On MTV tonite:
The Man With The
Blue Guitar
(Unplugged.)

X
Why can't I be
the comedian?
Oh, please let me.
Pick me.
Clip me.

XI
I can, oh I can,
I can quote the man:
“It is possible, possible,
possible.”

XII
Oh, hell, he’s just
so good. Let me quote him
again: “we keep coming back
and coming back
to the real.”

XIII
I'd say more,
but it’s Sunday
and time for
my bath.
Oh, and by the way–
you owe me five bucks.

Aunt Shecky
All rights reserved.

firefangled
10-04-2007, 02:06 PM
The winner should have received an orderly trip to Key West and the second runner up just an ordinary evening in New Haven. Personally I was disillusioned with this about ten o'clock. Then realizing some its abstractness, I came back, reread it while outside my window the dove in the tree built its nest and cooed (man, did my stomach feel better).

Very imaginative Aunty. The great thing about Stevens is you don't have to get him to enjoy him while you eventually get him. His objective, after all, was to baffle our intelligence almost completely.

AuntShecky
10-04-2007, 02:29 PM
I truly loved your reply, dear firefangled. But you know, I don't really think W.S. gave a rat's you-know-what about
our intelligence or lack of same. That is part of his appeal.
Thanks so much for your response!
Auntie

firefangled
10-05-2007, 07:21 AM
I truly loved your reply, dear firefangled. But you know, I don't really think W.S. gave a rat's you-know-what about
our intelligence or lack of same. That is part of his appeal.
Thanks so much for your response!
Auntie

I'm sure he was messing with our intelligence, Aunty, and he calculated that way and even told us his modus operandi in Man Carrying Thing:

The poem must resist the intelligence
Almost successfully. Illustration:

A Brune figure in winter evening resists
Identity. The thing he carries resists.

The most necessitous sense. Accept them, then,
As secondary (parts not quite perceived

Of the obvious whole, uncertain particles
Of the certain solid, the primary free from doubt,

Things floating like the first hundred flakes of snow
Out of a storm we must endure all night,

Out of a storm of secondary tthings),
A horror of thoughts that suddenly are real.

We must endure our thoughts all night, until
The bright obvious stands motionless in cold.

TheFifthElement
10-05-2007, 07:46 AM
Aunty, you're poem was BRILLIANT. Loved it, and 'The Man Carrying Thing' - thanks for posting that firefangled :)

Pendragon
10-09-2007, 10:18 AM
Very interesting thread! Let's see here: Ogden Nash

For a Poet Who Confuses Everyone and Then Some

On Ogden Nash
Bet cash
That if you read a poem before you're though it,
You will probably rue it.
I mean why does he make such outrageously long boring lines in poems, you know?
When the next one breaks the flow.
He makes a short line like this,
And then writes ad nauseam about the effects of a butterfly's kiss.
The crime?
To make the bloody poem rhyme.
Still, Nash is always good for a laugh or two
So go read his poetry. Do.

Pendragon
© 10/9/07

AuntShecky
10-09-2007, 02:22 PM
Oh my, that was some piece.about Odgen Nash, Pen! You actually demonstated what he did in his verses in your tribute or quasi-tribute. Wow. Kudos! (Have you ever heard of just one "kudo"?)
Auntie

Pendragon
10-11-2007, 10:02 AM
Oh my, that was some piece.about Odgen Nash, Pen! You actually demonstated what he did in his verses in your tribute or quasi-tribute. Wow. Kudos! (Have you ever heard of just one "kudo"?)
AuntieNot around here, Auntie. The Kudu vine (imported to control erosion) takes over everything! We hate it. But as a compliment, we love Kudos! Thank you. I have read enough of Ogden Nash to get a feel for him, true.

AuntShecky
10-11-2007, 11:16 AM
Pen, fortunately we don't have many kudzu vines here in the North.

blazeofglory
10-11-2007, 11:33 AM
This is from the "A Poem Is..." thread too, I guess this will do for here as well.

Thinking the thoughts,
Voicing the voices,
Feeling the feelings—
Till the pen encounters a nervous bite.

And then there it is—
An image unforeseen
Designed with care,
Till a word becomes a world,
And a dot-
A thought.

The whiteness of the canvas
Reveals from within
All the colors there was in it
All the colors there ever will be…

And there’s no stopping it
Once the emotions are in motion.

The parchment shivers
As the quill jots down its
Imperfect efforts.

A feeling has been felt,
A voice has been voiced,
A thought has found a face—
A poem has been penned down.

20 July '07.

There is indeed beauty in this poem. Something so marvelously so combined, in fact this poem proves two things: first poems can be made of anything. and secondly, the best thing it did was it commingled ideas with very perfect word order.

blp
10-17-2007, 06:11 AM
This is pretty much my only poem about poetry. I'm kind of hoping I'll never write another either, but you never know:


Poetry fulfills a real need

Did this shop ever have a menswear department?
She asked, an immediate family member doing what
all members of my immediate family immediately do,
already
I could feel my throat tightening
It did? But…do you mean this shop or
all of them?
All of them? Really? Or just
some branches?

No time to think of Autumn
or possibilities
No time to think of leaves
or leaving

throat tightening

Please
Adrenally
Please
What does it matter?
And why
do you imagine I would

know


If you’re going to talk about anything
You have to talk about it properly, she said
viciously
lying
leaving
no space to talk
properly or not
about hell
forcing an argument
about nothing

We walked around the corner up Broadwick St. Before she came out of the shop I’d been thinking about nonsense, lemonade, good conversation, peace and I thought of my analyst wondering why I had suddenly started to write poetry, realized it might not matter as much as it seemed to if I could just let myself have it and not bother with the silly fight I didn’t want and said

But glass of water men’s jigsaw not

That…no wait…that doesn’t

even make
grammatical
sense
she replied suspiciously
unless…

Banks of the river jumping jack flash

I replied

And my whole body
in the cold Autumn street
felt warm

And it all meant something – really
as I found out in analysis later

blp
10-22-2007, 12:41 PM
13 Ways Of Looking At Wallace Stevens

I
Five bucks says
you don't get ‘im
the first time.

II
There was a jockey
with the same last name.
Every time I bet on him
he lost, and every time
I bet against him,
he won.

III
You know, there are several
different kinds of blackbirds.
One species has a broad red
racing stripe on each wing.
The others don't.

IV
I really dread doing it,
but I guess I'd better
start looking into getting
some kind of insurance.

V
What’s the big deal with
the glass of water and that jar
in Tennessee? I thought
down south they were
big on bourbon.

VI
Things as they are
are never quite as good
as we want ‘em to be
and never quite as bad
as we think.

VII
You don't see many women
wearing peignoirs these days.
Then again, you can find
a load of complacency
in a pair of sweatpants.

VIII
What kind of ice-cream
would you order if you were
an emperor?

IX
On MTV tonite:
The Man With The
Blue Guitar
(Unplugged.)

X
Why can't I be
the comedian?
Oh, please let me.
Pick me.
Clip me.

XI
I can, oh I can,
I can quote the man:
“It is possible, possible,
possible.”

XII
Oh, hell, he’s just
so good. Let me quote him
again: “we keep coming back
and coming back
to the real.”

XIII
I'd say more,
but it’s Sunday
and time for
my bath.
Oh, and by the way–
you owe me five bucks.

Aunt Shecky
All rights reserved.

Excellent.

Reminds me of a comic strip from Raw Magazine years ago ('the magazine for damned intellectuals):

INSURANCE MAN (looking not unlike Wallace Stevens): There is no God.

Pause

You need more insurance.

Insurance man leaves, having, presumably, closed a sale.

INSURANCE CUSTOMER: He's a damned intellectual.

Horsehead
10-22-2007, 01:47 PM
13 Ways Of Looking At Wallace Stevens

I
Five bucks says
you don't get ‘im
the first time.

II
There was a jockey
with the same last name.
Every time I bet on him
he lost, and every time
I bet against him,
he won.

III
You know, there are several
different kinds of blackbirds.
One species has a broad red
racing stripe on each wing.
The others don't.

IV
I really dread doing it,
but I guess I'd better
start looking into getting
some kind of insurance.

V
What’s the big deal with
the glass of water and that jar
in Tennessee? I thought
down south they were
big on bourbon.

VI
Things as they are
are never quite as good
as we want ‘em to be
and never quite as bad
as we think.

VII
You don't see many women
wearing peignoirs these days.
Then again, you can find
a load of complacency
in a pair of sweatpants.

VIII
What kind of ice-cream
would you order if you were
an emperor?

IX
On MTV tonite:
The Man With The
Blue Guitar
(Unplugged.)

X
Why can't I be
the comedian?
Oh, please let me.
Pick me.
Clip me.

XI
I can, oh I can,
I can quote the man:
“It is possible, possible,
possible.”

XII
Oh, hell, he’s just
so good. Let me quote him
again: “we keep coming back
and coming back
to the real.”

XIII
I'd say more,
but it’s Sunday
and time for
my bath.
Oh, and by the way–
you owe me five bucks.

Aunt Shecky
All rights reserved.

Numbers are naked,
Since their figure is known
VIII is an 8
The emperor's clothes
I admit that I see
The figure,
I have figured out
The emperor is naked

AuntShecky
10-22-2007, 01:53 PM
Numbers are naked,
Since their figure is known
VIII is an 8
The emperor's clothes
I admit that I see
The figure,
I have figured out
The emperor is naked

that may very well be true, Horsehead, but rest assured that nearly everyone on the Literature network is fully clothed.

symphony
10-23-2007, 06:00 PM
Just wrote this:


Way below the shimmering
dome of thoughtosphere,
some hardly felt feelings
form a residual stratum
of their own.

A touch, a stir,
when the eye or the ear
or the mind stumbles across
a flavor that has to be breathed in
and taken into the very core, where those

oddments suddenly find
a life. Surging through
the mists of the once forgotten,
surmounting the countless layers,
yet charred with the burn they caused,
pushing aside the sprinklings of asteroidal thoughts,

they’re freed and fall into the space and time
of this waiting parchment.



I know there're some words in it which are so very commonplace (say, "taken into the very core"). But erm...
Too stupid? :confused:

symphony
10-24-2007, 09:30 AM
Ah i cant believe i forgot to post one of my favorite poems in here! My current sig is a part of this poem. Here goes--


The Pain of Being Created III

Of A Poem…

A
Swift swish of
Thoughts, in a
Clear corner
Of the mind---
A shiver in the
Surface of the
Parchment----
And the timid
Pen shudders
Along with it---
The parchment
Stain’d with the
Blood seeping,
From the pen--
(In pain & awe
Of birth)as
Ink.


http://www.pix-hoster.com/upload/of_a_pd49.jpg

schadenfreude
10-30-2007, 06:46 AM
How do you write a poem?
To show people you care?
How do you write a story?
That the whole world can share?

You write a poem by trying
And if you’re really stuck
Using words such as lying
Dying, crying, sighing
And trying your luck

And if it still does not work
Then make one that does not rhyme
Or write
A
Poem
That
Is a funny
Shape.