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View Full Version : How about Jack London? I'm writing a paper and need all your help.



missjane
12-08-2006, 05:57 AM
English is not my mother language. And now I'm writting a paper of his works, concentrating on Sea-wolf and Martin Eden. About Six pages, not an easy work. So I want to talk about my opinion.
Jack london, a very different writer, writes his novels with his own experiences.
With a mess mind, I don't know how to make my opinion clear, I'm trying. If you think my wrting is terrible. Add me to your list and give me your help. My MSN [email protected] Thank you!!!

B-Mental
12-08-2006, 06:08 AM
London is a very powerful writer simply because he does write from experience. I just finished the Sea Wolf last month, and will offer some help, if possible.

jon1jt
12-08-2006, 06:21 AM
English is not my mother language. And now I'm writting a paper of his works, concentrating on Sea-wolf and Martin Eden. About Six pages, not an easy work. So I want to talk about my opinion.
Jack london, a very different writer, writes his novels with his own experiences.
With a mess mind, I don't know how to make my opinion clear, I'm trying. If you think my wrting is terrible. Add me to your list and give me your help. My MSN [email protected] Thank you!!!


what is your take on Martin Eden? maybe i can assist, it's my favorite book.

Whifflingpin
12-08-2006, 09:59 AM
"London is a very powerful writer simply because he does write from experience"

My grandfather told me, oh decades ago, that Jack London thought of himself as a practical man but that he was, practically speaking, incompetent - a laughable bodger. I seem to remember that he tried to show boatbuilders how to build boats, or something, but was so incapable that he only earned their ridicule.

Good writer, but take his experiences with a pinch of salt.

.

ShoutGrace
12-08-2006, 11:27 AM
Jack London's letter to his editor concerning "To Build a Fire."

Dear Mr. Revision Editor: -

In reply to questions will (I) - At go off, Vincent* took matches from inside pocket. It does not matter what he does with matches during first several attempts to build fire - not until he leaves that place and starts along the trail. Then insert, page 6, after "The frost had beaten him. His hands were worthless," the following: "But he had the foresight to drop the bunch of mathces into his wide mouthed outside pocket. There, in dispair [sic], he slipped on his mittens and started to run up the trail," etc, etc.

(II) Take my word for it, that a man simply cannot build a fire with heavy Klondike mittens on his hands. I have seen hundreds of such fires built in cold weather, and I never even saw a man attempt to build one fire with mittened hands. It is impossible. I have built a fire at 74 degrees below zero, and I did it with my naked hands.

It is an old Alaskan tragedy, this firebuilding. They have traced a man, from his first careful attempts at a fire to his last wild & feeble attempt, and found his stiff body - this has been done more than once. You see, the time element must be considered. At such low temperatures flesh freezes quickly. The fire must be built quickly.

Why, I ran two hundred feet and back again, through the dead calm air at 65 below, and nipped my ear so badly that it kept me awake through the night, later turned black and peeled off all the skin.

I do not know what kind of mittens you have in the East. Up north they are of fairly thick, pretty thick, moosehide (native-tanned) and they are warmly lined with flannel. It is impossible to strike a sulphur match and cherish the slow growing flame thereof with such mittens on one's hands. To have attempted it with a bunch would be to cause a healthy conflagration, widespread burns & much smoke - three things which would effectively put a quietus on the fire.

ShoutGrace
12-08-2006, 10:33 PM
I'm not sure if my post was entirely clear or not - it is mostly in response to the opening post, with a quibble on Whifflingpin's (both being the same topic, of course). ;)

missjane
12-09-2006, 12:17 AM
I have decide the title. How do you think of "To find a true Jack London from Sea-wolf and Martin Eden"?
I think he is a man with a great life and a contractive mind. his life experience, his getting knowledge, and his ideas are so different from other writers. Sea-wolf can show his constractive mind while Martin Eden maily show his differcult life. From this two aspects, I want to form a true Jack London figure. My article is not so good with such a little knowledge of me but I will do my best to make it meaningful, not an empty paper.
PS: I can't find an Englsih version of Sailor On Horseback. I need to quote some sections, I hope some could help me. like mailing a version of e-book, if this is ilegal and you cannot do this, it is ok. you can offer me some sections in english version. Thank you!!!

genoveva
12-09-2006, 02:32 AM
I have decide the title. How do you think of "To find a true Jack London from Sea-wolf and Martin Eden"?

I want to form a true Jack London figure.

Just focusing on your title- It doesn't really tell me much about what your paper is going to be about. Maybe consider reworking your title to incorporate something more 'clean cut'. What about incorporating that you want to "form a true Jack London figure" somehow in your title? Is that your goal? Good Luck!

mtpspur
12-09-2006, 04:01 AM
In reading your posts I wondered if you were attempting to find the man Jack London from what he writes of. I have only read The Sea Wolf and Call of the Wild and the IMPRESSIONS I have of Jack London the man is that he values life in the raw stripped of all pretenses and the veneer of civilization and sophistication and that man is possibly above the animal nature but not by much. I'm simplifying this (it what I do with anything) but I suspect Mr London would be of the survival of the fittest believer. Hope this is of some help to you.

quasimodo1
05-05-2007, 08:49 PM
Love everything Jack London wrote, especially "White Fang" and "The Sea Wolf". The latter is best for examining his point of view especially since it takes place on a ship with a dictitorial, cynical captain (perhaps his perception of government). If you can highlight the key passages of "The Sea Wolf", you will, in my analysis, have captured the essence of London"s work, which, by the way, were numerous and completed before his death at the ripe old age of forty. quasimodo1