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bazarov
06-22-2006, 06:21 PM
I've tried to find, but I can't(also can't remember :rage: ); what did father Hamlet said to young Hamlet about ''not giving money to your friends''?

Logos
06-22-2006, 06:53 PM
The search function on the texts is really handy :)

http://www.online-literature.com/shakespeare/hamlet/4/

Act 1. Scene III

you mean this?

"Neither a borrower nor a lender be;
For loan oft loses both itself and friend,
And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.
This above all: to thine ownself be true,
And it must follow, as the night the day,
Thou canst not then be false to any man.
Farewell: my blessing season this in thee!"

bazarov
06-23-2006, 02:29 AM
Yes, thanks! :nod:

John Bushdies
07-16-2006, 05:22 PM
That's Polonius to Laertes.
(Caution - Polonius is a fool - Shakespeare meant this as a joke.)

bazarov
08-28-2006, 09:45 AM
That's Polonius to Laertes.
(Caution - Polonius is a fool - Shakespeare meant this as a joke.)

Hamlet's father is also called Hamlet. So, ghost of Hamlet senior is talking with Hamlet junior...

Janine
11-19-2006, 04:52 PM
Yes, but it was between Polonius and his son, not senior Hamlet and son Hamlet. Polonius was givng Laertes advice before he embarked on going to France.

Niamh
11-19-2006, 05:32 PM
i think you will find that it is polonius telling Laertes not to give money to friends;
Act 1 Scene 3 line 62- 72

" The friend thou hast, and their adoption tried,
Grapple them to thy soul with hoops of steel,
But do not dull thy palm with entertainment
Of each new-hatch'd, unfledg'd comrade. Beware
Of entrance to a quarrel; but, being in,
Bear't that the opposed may beware of thee.
Give everyman thine ear, but few thy voice;
Take each mans censure, but reserve thy judgement.
Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy,
but not express'd in fancy; rich not gaudy;
For the apparel oft proclaims the man:
And they in france of the best rank and station
Are most select and generous, chief in that. "

In other words, dont trust you friends enough to give them money, as there are those that will select you as a friend because they may se you as an easy target. keep it to yourself and nobody will take advantage of you.

Hamlets father on the other hand mainly tells hamlet you use his friends to reveal the truth about his death and avenge him.

schadenfreude
05-15-2007, 05:07 AM
I don't recall King Hamlet ever counselling his son about money.

Ray Eston Smith
05-22-2007, 02:32 PM
It was Polonius advising his son Laertes. Laertes died because he ignored that advice.

Polonius
Neither a borrower nor a lender be;
For loan oft loses both itself and friend,
And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.

Laertes [plotting with Claudius to murder Hamlet with a poisoned sword]
...And for my means, I'll husband them so well,
They shall go far with little.

Although Laertes is satisfied in nature with Hamletís repentance, he continues the fatal duel until by some elder masters [Claudius] he has a voice and precedence of peace. Thus he is fighthing not for himself but for a cause borrowed from Claudius.

When Laertes allied himself with Claudius he dulled the edge of his husbandry. Then, in the subsequent duel with Hamlet, Laertes first wounded Hamlet with his poison-tipped sword, then accidently exchanged swords with Hamlet and was fatally poisoned with his own sword. Thus he was a borrower and lender of swords, and was killed by a lent sword while fighting for a borrowed cause. And he lost a friend (Hamlet).

http://academia.wikia.com/wiki/More_Motifs_in_Hamlet#To_Thine_Ownself__Be_True