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matty2k2007
03-14-2006, 08:22 PM
i have to do a report on charles dickens and great expectations but i am having trouble with a part of the report i have to state what the title of the book means and talk about it but i have no idea wut to do can sumone please help me out with this please i would greatly appreciate it. thanx in advance.

Scheherazade
03-14-2006, 08:25 PM
What is the book about? What happens to the characters?

DelawareProphet
03-16-2006, 01:09 PM
I'm doing an AP report about "Great Expectations" right now. I think the title has something to do with the nature of Pip's perception of society. He comes from a poor blacksmith family and has these great expectations of what he's missing out on. As the book progresses these "great" expectations become less and less great to Pip. I am at the part right now where he just meets Magwitch (as Uncle Provis) and he is just realizing how much he'd rather be back at home at the forge than live out all of these great expectations he had for the rich social class. I hope this helps, because I know I will need lots of help on the theme of this book. Post back if you have anything else to discuss.

just4lizzy
03-21-2006, 01:44 AM
At first, the money and chance to become a gentleman is referred to as Pip's "great expectations" when Mr. Jaggers says, "Now I return to this young fellow. And the communication I have got to make is that he has great expectations." Later on, "great expecations" is kind of like the theme of the story. Pip's great expectation(s) is his ambition; he is always trying to improve either morally or socially. I suggest you finish reading the whole book first to get the full idea of the meaning of the title.

Grongle
03-27-2006, 04:39 AM
And, generally speaking, "great expectations" in that time did refer to an estate, or will, which would provide financial ease of living. It was a fairly specific reference to such an anticipated windfall, and it was not such a vague or obscure or casual reference we would consider it to be today. "Expectations" was a polite way of expressing pretty much a sure thing.

You can research the value of Pip's money yourself, and do your own arithmetic. When I checked it out quite recently, he was sitting pretty on his twenty-first birthday. Then and once a year after that he was to receive roughly fifty thousand dollars—as I said, depending on your calculations.

That was the "great" part of his great expectations. (Haha! Not really. But, yes, it was roughly the dollar equivalent value.)

—Matty, if you are having trouble "gaining entrance" to this book, ask yourself what you think of Pip. Is he a nice guy? Would he be fun at a party? Would he make a good friend? Read the book as though you were really interested in maybe spending some time with this guy. Don't take anything for granted. Ask yourself what Pip is really like. Charles Dickens doesn't care whether you love Pip or hate Pip or even if you change your mind about Pip—but he (Dickens) sure would like you to have your own opinion about Pip. You do that, and you'll understand the book very well, and you'll make it a heck of a lot more fun to read. :)

cateye515
04-03-2006, 12:55 PM
i have to do a report on charles dickens and great expectations but i am having trouble with a part of the report i have to state what the title of the book means and talk about it but i have no idea wut to do can sumone please help me out with this please i would greatly appreciate it. thanx in advance.


it refers to the expectations or the future that pip has to look forward to. or at least thats what i got out of it :banana:

cateye515
04-03-2006, 12:59 PM
i have to do a presentation on great expectations and i am not quite sure how do profile the characters (ie. Pip and estella and miss havisham) please help
:goof: