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Edmond
09-20-2005, 11:15 AM
Can anyone cite specific examples of Humor and comedy in Great Expectations, thanks!

mono
09-20-2005, 05:11 PM
Yikes! That sounds nearly as difficult as spotting tragedy in Shakespeare's A Comedy Of Errors. :D
I think it really depends on the idea of 'comedy,' as the classic example defines as merely a story with a happy ending, but I know what you mean. ;)
Well, when you really think of the concept of Miss Havisham's almost unspoken of plot to take revenge on men, after getting jilted by her fiancÚ minutes before marriage, I suppose that can seem somewhat humorous. How she tempts Pip by the tantalizing ways of Estella, I often wondered if Miss Havisham actually taught Estella to tease so cruelly.
Joe, Pip's brother-in-law, I know, gets picked on a lot by his wife, known only as Mrs. Joe. In a way, I really feel sorry for Joe, but can seem some dark humor there, with Mrs. Joe's "tickler" cane, which she used to command at Joe and Pip.
The conclusion to the novel, I think, ends in any way but with comedy. True, it ends in Pip's hopes and "expectations," after meeting Estella again, but her fate, in fact, sounded very tragic.

Sitaram
09-20-2005, 05:19 PM
Yikes! That sounds nearly as difficult as spotting tragedy in Shakespeare's A Comedy Of Errors. :D
I think it really depends on the idea of 'comedy,' as the classic example defines as merely a story with a happy ending, but I know what you mean. ;)
Well, when you really think of the concept of Miss Havisham's almost unspoken of plot to take revenge on men, after getting jilted by her fiancÚ minutes before marriage, I suppose that can seem somewhat humorous. How she tempts Pip by the tantalizing ways of Estella, I often wondered if Miss Havisham actually taught Estella to tease so cruelly.
Joe, Pip's brother-in-law, I know, gets picked on a lot by his wife, known only as Mrs. Joe. In a way, I really feel sorry for Joe, but can seem some dark humor there, with Mrs. Joe's "tickler" cane, which she used to command at Joe and Pip.
The conclusion to the novel, I think, ends in any way but with comedy. True, it ends in Pip's hopes and "expectations," after meeting Estella again, but her fate, in fact, sounded very tragic.

As a child, I was confused about the title of Dante's works. I asked a teacher. They explained that the word Comedy may sometimes denote a gratual lightening or upward development. Sliding down Satan's side, and making ones way up to heaven certainly qualifies as upward development.

I just have a moment right now. Perhaps I shall return with a more complete thought regarding comedy.